April 2007 - Waterloo Brain Day

People standing on top of a brainWhy a Brain Day?

The brain is a horrendously complex and poorly understood system that poses both an immense challenge -- and possibly rich rewards -- to neuroscientists, psychologists, philosophers, and computer scientists. To celebrate Waterloo's recent establishment of the Centre for Theoretical Neuroscience (CTN), which integrates these approaches to the brain, and to highlight the already established Cognitive Science Program, we have invited four internationally renowned speakers to present generally accessible lectures from each of these perspectives.

Date: Friday, April 27, 2007, 9:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m.
Place: Psychology, Anthropology, Sociology building (PAS), room 2083, University of Waterloo

Schedule:
9:00 Welcome
9:15 James McClelland, Psychology Department, Stanford University
       Title: Semantic Cognition: A Parallel Distributed Processing Approach
10:45 William Bechtel, Philosophy Department, University of California,
         San Diego
       Title: The Return of the Mind-Brain Identity Theory
Lunch
1:30 Geoffrey Hinton, Computer Science Department, University of Toronto
       Title: Learning Deep Generative Models in a Neural Network
3:00 J. Anthony Movshon, Center for Neural Science, New York University
       Title: Cortical Analysis of Visual Motion
4:15 Reception

Sponsored by:
University of Waterloo Centre for Theoretical Neuroscience
Cognitive Science Program
Faculty of Arts

Waterloo researchers among top in Canada

Chris Eliasmith writing on a whiteboardChris Eliasmith, Director of the Centre for Theoretical Neuroscience, received the prestigious John C. Polanyi Award  and is also an inaugural member of the Royal Society of Canada's College of New Scholars, Artists, and Scientists.

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How to Build a Brain

Chris Eliasmith’s team at the Centre for Theoretical Neuroscience has built Spaun, the world’s largest simulation of a functioning brain. The related book is now available and for the full article Waterloo Stories.

Nengo

This is a collection of coverage of work with Nengo (Neural Engineering Objects) that has appeared in the popular press recently.