Sharing our knowledge

The COMPASS Study collects data on a number of youth health behaviours. Using these data, we have created a number of knowledge products. Sharing our findings and producing usable knowledge tools is an important step in working collaboratively to improve youth health. Our knowledge products and resources are provided below:

Vaping/e-cigarettes

Link to COMPASS vaping brochure

Changes in the e-cigarette environment

  • There have been rapid shifts in the language used to describe e-cigarette use (or vaping) behaviour and in the type of devices used by youth. COMPASS continuously monitors these shifts and revises questionnaire wording to reflect current terminology.
  • Shifts in regulation of e-cigarette devices in Canada can impact use among  youth. Devices containing nicotine have been legalized, increasing availability and advertising. COMPASS data can evaluate how changes in these regulations impact e-cigarette use behaviours and reasons for use among participating students.

Trends in e-cigarette use among students in the COMPASS Study

Did you know?

  • Among Ontario students participating in COMPASS in 2018/19, 28% of males and 23% of females aged 15-19 have used e-cigarettes at least once in the last 30 days. 
  • Current e-cigarettes use has increased from 8% in 2013/14 to 26% in 2018/19 among COMPASS participants in Ontario. 

2013-14 to 2018-19 current use of e-cigarettes in COMPASS schools. Details in text following the chart.

This figure describes the percent of students who currently use e-cigarettes in Alberta, British Columbia, Ontario, and Quebec from 2013/14 to 2018/19; current use has increased in all provinces over this time.

Current e-cigarette use is defined as any use in the past 30 days 

Source: 2013-14 to 2018-19 COMPASS schools

2015-16 to 2018-19 ever use of e-cigarettes in COMPASS schools. Details in text following the chart.

This figure describes the percent of students who have ever used e-cigarettes in Alberta, British Columbia, Ontario and Quebec from 2015/16 to 2018/19; ever use has increased in all provinces except British Columbia.

Ever use is defined as ever having tried e-cigarettes

Source: 2015-16 to 2018-19 COMPASS schools

2013-14 to 2018-19 current use of e-cigarettes by grade in COMPASS schools. Details in text following the chart.

This figure describes the percent of grade 9, 10, 11, and 12 students who currently use e-cigarettes from 2013/14 to 2018/19; current use has increased in all grades over this time.

Source: 2013-14 to 2018-19 COMPASS Ontario schools

2013-14 to 2018-19 current use of e-cigarettes by gender in COMPASS schools. Details in text following the chart.

This figure described the percent of male and female students who currently use e-cigarettes from 2013/14 to 2018/19; use has increased amongst males and females over this time.

Source: 2013-14 to 2018-19 COMPASS Ontario schools

2013-14 to 2018-19 current use of e-cigarettes by ethnicity in COMPASS schools. Details in text following the chart.

This figure describes the percent of current e-cigarette usage among White, Black, Asian, Aboriginal, and Hispanic students from 2013/14 to 2018/19; current usage has increased across all demographics over this time.

Source: 2013-14 to 2018-19 COMPASS Ontario schools

2013-14 to 2018-19 current use of e-cigarettes by smoking status in COMPASS schools. Details in text following the chart.

This figure describes the percent of non-susceptible never smokers, susceptible never smokers, non-current smokers, and current smokers using e-cigarettes between 2013/14 and 2018/19; current use increased across all groups over this time.

Source: 2013-14 to 2018-19 COMPASS Ontario schools

Relating youth smoking to e-cigarette use

  • COMPASS results suggest that e-cigarettes are expanding the tobacco market by attracting low-risk youth who would otherwise be unlikely to initiate use of cigarettes. (Aleyan et al, 2019)
  • Recent COMPASS findings demonstrate a reciprocal relationship between cigarette and e-cigarette use and e-cigarette use was found to predict subsequent cigarette use. (Aleyan et al, 2018)
  • E-cigarette use may contribute to the development of a new population of cigarette smokers. (Aleyan et al, 2018)

Other health behaviours associated with e-cigarette use

  • COMPASS findings suggest that e-cigarette use is connected with the use of other substances such as cannabis, tobacco and alcohol (alcohol being the strongest link). (Zuckermann et al, 2019)

  • Moreover, e-cigarette use has been found to be an important contributing factor in the use of multiple substances (poly-substance use).(Zuckermann et al, 2019)

Reasons for use among e-cigarette users in 2018/19

2018-19 reasons for using e-cigarettes among participants in COMPASS schools. Details in text following the chart.

This figure describes the reasons students use e-cigarettes: curiosity was the most frequent response, followed by other reasons, the ability to use in places smoking is not allowed, to smoke less, and finally to quit.

Values do not add up to 100% as students could select more than one response

Source: 2018-19 COMPASS schools

Built environment and e-cigarettes

  • E-cigarette retailer proximity and density surroundinga school were not significantly associated with thelikelihood of ever or currently using e-cigarettes. (Cole et al, 2019)
  • These findings suggest that students are accessing e-cigarettes through other sources. (Cole et al, 2019)
  • School-level policies banning the use of e-cigarettes on school property may be effective in reducing e-cigarette use (or preventing it) in their current form. (Milicic et al, 2018)

Cannabis 

Link to COMPASS cannabis brochure

Cannabis legislation in Canada

  • In 2018, Canada federally legalized the recreational use of cannabis among adults, with minimum age requirements varying by province. 

  • "After a steady decrease in patterns of cannabis use among youth over several years, it appears that there has been a gradual increase in cannabis use among youth following the start of discourse around cannabis legalization, with some populations of youth being at greater risk. " (Zuckermann et al, 2019)

Trends in cannabis use

Did you know?

  • Among students participating in COMPASS in 2018/19, 26% have used cannabis at least once in their lifetime, and 13% report using at least monthly. 
  • Cannabis use increases with grade and spending money, and use is more common among males and indigenous students.

2013-14 to 2018-19 cannabis use by province in COMPASS schools. Details in text following the chart.

This figure describes the percent of students who use cannabis in Alberta and Ontario from 2013/14 to 2018/19 and British Columbia and Quebec from 2016/17 to 2018/19; use has largely remained constant with slight changes year to year, except British Columbia which has decreased.

Cannabis use is defined as any use in the past 30 days

Souce: 2013-14 to 2018-19 COMPASS schools

02013-14 to 2018-19 frequency of cannabis use in Ontario COMPASS schools. Details in text following the chart.

This figure describes frequency of cannabis use among students between 2013/14 and 2018/19, categorized by daily, weekly, monthly, occasional, and non-use; over this time, non-use has decreased, occasional and monthly use has increased, and weekly and daily use has remained constant.

Source: 2013-14 to 2018-19 Ontario COMPASS schools

2013-14 to 2018-19 cannabis use by gender in Ontario COMPASS schools. Details in text following the chart.

This figure describes the percent of male and female students who currently use cannabis between 2013/14 and2018/19; use has increased in both genders, and female use has remained consistently lower than male use.

Current cannabis use is defined as any use in the past 30 days. 

Source: 2013-14 to 2018-19 COMPASS Ontario Schools

2013-14 to 2018-19 cannabis use by grade in Ontario COMPASS schools. Details in text following the chart.

This figure describes the percent of students in grades 9, 10, 11, and 12 who currently use cannabis between 2013/14 and 2018/19; cannabis use increases by grade, and over time remains steady across most grades, however grade 10 and 12 show slight increases.

Source: 2013-14 to 2018-19 COMPASS Ontario Schools

2013-14 to 2018-19 cannabis use by ethnicity in Ontario COMPASS schools. Details in text following the chart.

This figure depicts the use of cannabis between 2013/14 and 2018/19 among White, Black, Asian, Indigenous, and Hispanic students; Indigenous students have the highest frequency of use, followed by Black, White, Hispanic and Asian students. Use among Black and Hispanic students has decreased, use among Indigenous and Asian students has remained the same, and use among White students has increased over this time.

Source: 2013-14 to 2018-19 COMPASS Ontario Schools

2013-14 to 2018-19 cannabis use by spending money in Ontario COMPASS schools. Details in text following the chart.

This figure describes the percent of students who currently use cannabis based on weekly amounts of spending money between 2013/14 and 2018/19; students with $100+ use the most cannabis, followed by $41-$100, $11-$40, $1-$10, and zero dollars of weekly spending money. Use among all groups has shown slight year to year changes but remain steady overall, except an increase in use among students with $100+ weekly spending money.

Source: 2013-14 to 2018-19 COMPASS Ontario Schools

Cannabis use and mental health

  • Students who use cannabis more commonly report symptoms of depression and anxiety and these symptoms increase as cannabis is used more frequently. (Butler et al, 2019)

  • The presence of depressive symptoms, and poorer emotional regulation skills were associated with higher rates of cannabis use.(Romano et al, 2019)

  • Students who report greater psychosocial wellbeing (e.g. flourishing) are less likely to use cannabis or use at higher frequencies. (Romano et al, 2019; Butler er al., 2019)

Other health behaviours associated with cannabis use

  • Polysubstance use, inclusive of cannabis, vaping and alcohol, was reported by 13.5% of Ontario and Alberta students. (Zuckermann et al, 2019)
  • Escalation of cannabis use throughout high school was associated with being male, vaping, and low math marks. (Zuckermann et al, 2018)
  • Students that engage in healthier behaviours (e.g., meeting screen time and sleep guidelines) are less likely to use cannabis. (Romano et al, 2019)
  • Binge drinking, cigarette use, vaping, and opioid use were all associated with higher rates of cannabis use. (Romano et al, 2019)

Modes of use among students who use cannabis in 2018/19

2018-19 modes of cannabis use in Ontario COMPASS schools. Details in text following the chart.

This figure describes the mode of cannabis use among students who use cannabis on an occasional, monthly, weekly, and daily basis, categorized by smoking, vaping, and eating or drinking cannabis. Smoking is consistently the most frequent mode of use, followed by eating or drinking then vaping. The percent of students who consume in any way increases with more frequent use.

Values do not add up to 100% as students could select more than one response. 

Cannabis and school outcomes

  • Improving school connectedness is protective against the frequency of cannabis use among students. (Weatherson et al, 2018)
  • Students who used cannabis were less likely to attend class regularly, complete their homework, and achieve and value high marks, relative to their peers who abstained from using cannabis. (Patte et al, 2017; Williams et al, 2019)

Alcohol 

Link to COMPASS alcohol brochure

Changes to the alcohol environment

  • There have been a number of provincial government-led changes, such as extended hours of sale, and changes to where alcohol can be consumed and purchased, that may shift the social environment surrounding consumption.
  • Youth in the jurisdictions exposed to the latest change in LCBO policy authorizing grocery stores to sell alcohol are more likely to transition from abstinence to high-risk regular drinking and high-risk regular drinkers are more likely to maintain their behaviours (Gohari. et al, under review)

Trends in frequency of alcohol use among students in the COMPASS Study

Did you know?

  • Among Ontario students participating in the COMPASS study in 2018/10, 41% of males and 37% of females aged 15-19 have had more than a sip of alcohol in the last 30 days.
  • Among grade 12 students participating in the COMPASS study in 2018/19, 75% have had more than a sip of alcohol at least once in their lifetime.
  • "Male and upper grade students had greater likelihood of engaging in high [risk] level patterns of alcohol consumption." (Gohari et al, 2020)

2013-14 to 2018-19 frequency of alcohol use in Ontario COMPASS schools. Details in text following the chart.

This figure describes the frequency of alcohol use between 2013/14 and 2018/19; non-use, occasional, and daily use has increased, and weekly and monthly use has decreased over this time.

Alchol use is defined as any use that was more than just a sip in the last 12 months. 

Source: 2013-14 to 2018-19 COMPASS Ontario schools. 

2013-14 to 2018-19 frequency of binge drinking in Ontario COMPASS schools. Details in text following the chart.

This figure describes the frequency of binge drinking between the years of 2013/14 and 2018/19; non-use has increased, weekly binge drinking has decreased, and occasional, monthly, and daily binge drinking has remained stable over this time.

Binge drinking is defined as consuming 5 drinks of alcohol or more on one occasion in the last 12 months. 

Source: 2013-14 to 2018-19 COMPASS Ontario schools. 

2013-14 to 2018-19 binge drinking by gender in Ontario COMPASS schools. Details in text following the chart.

This figure describes the percent of male and female students who currently binge drink between 2013/14 and 2018/19; use has decreased in both genders, and female use has remained consistently lower than male use over this time.

Source: 2013-14 to 2018-19 COMPASS Ontario schools

2013-14 to 2018-19 binge drinking by grade in Ontario COMPASS schools. Details in text following the chart.

This figure describes the percent of students in grade 9, 10, 11, and 12 who currently binge drink between 2013/14 and 2018/19; binge drinking increases with each grade, and has decreased in all groups over this time.

Source: 2013-14 to 2018-19 COMPASS Ontario schools

2013-14 to 2018-19 binge drinking by ethnicity in Ontario COMPASS schools. Details in text following the chart.

This figure depicts the rates of binge drinking between 2013/14 and 2018/19 among White, Black, Asian, Indigenous, and Hispanic students. Indigenous students have the highest frequency of binging, followed by White, Black and Hispanic, and Asian students. Binge drinking among all students has decreased over this time.

Source: 2013-14 to 2018-19 COMPASS Ontario schools

2013-14 to 2018-19 binge drinking by weekly spending money in Ontario COMPASS schools. Details in text following the chart.

This figure describes the percent of students who currently binge drink based on weekly amounts of spending money between 2013/14 and 2018/19. Students with $100+ use the most cannabis, followed by those students who value between $41-$100, $11-$40, $1-$10, and zero dollars of weekly spending money. Binge drinking among all groups has decreased over this time.

Source: 2013-14 to 2018-19 COMPASS Ontario schools

Age of alcohol use in initiation among grade 12 students in 2018/19

2018-19 age of alcohol use initiation among students participating from Ontario COMPASS schools. Details in text following the chart.

This figure describes the age of alcohol initiation among grade 12 students; 28% had never drunk, 7% stated at 10 or younger, 1% started at 11, 4% started at 12, 7% started at 13, 15% started at 14, 17% started at 15, 14% started at 16, and 6% started at 17 years or older.

Source: Participating students from 2018-19 COMPASS schools

Health behaviours and early initiation to alcohol consumption

  • Early initiation of alcohol consumption increases the likelihood for older students to engage in heavy drinking. (Gohari et al, 2019)
  • "Youth engaging in current binge drinking were approximately three times more likely to smoke tobacco and almost eight times more likely to use cannabis." (Butler et al, 2019)
  • Students who started binge drinking in grade 10 or 11 had larger body weight and BMI increases in comparison to those who never became binge drinkers. (Vermeer et al, 2019)
  • Younger age of first alcohol use was associated with increased Moderate to Vigorous Physical Activity (MVPA) in grade 12. (Williams et al, 2019)

Relating youth binge drinking to other health behaviours and outcomes

  • The most common dual use of substances were alcohol and e-cigarettes. (Zuckermann et al, 2019)
  • Grade 12 students with higher levels of school connectedness were more likely to use alcohol and binge drink. (Holligan et al, 2019)
  • Team sport participation has been shown to be associated with binge drinking among COMPASS student participants. (Butler et al, 2019)
  • Among adolescent girls, those who were considered dieters were at increased risk of becoming involved in binge drinking in subsequent years. (Raffoul et al, 2018)
  • "Adolescents who initiate binge drinking have a relatively higher risk of poor academic performance, and a lack of preparedness and engagement" (Patte et al, 2017)

Obesity

Les adolescents et la COVID-19: résultats préliminaires des enquêtes COMPASS 2020 dans 29 écoles secondaires de 3 Régions de l'Est-du-Québec

Lien vers le rapport Les adolescents et la COVID-19: résultats préliminaires des enquêtes COMPASS 2020 dans 29 écoles secondaires de 3 Régions de l'Est-du-Québec

Auteurs
Slim Haddad, MD, PhD
Professeur titulaire, Département de médecine sociale et préventive, Faculté de Médecine, Université Laval; Chercheur, Centre de recherche en santé durable de l’Université Laval (VITAM);
Médecin conseil à la Direction régionale de santé publique de la Capitale-Nationale.
Richard E Bélanger, MD
Pédiatre/Médecin de l’Adolescence, Centre mère-enfant Soleil du CHU de Québec-Université Laval;
Professeur agrégé, Département de pédiatrie, Faculté de Médecine, Université Laval;
Chercheur associé, Centre de recherche en santé durable de l’Université Laval (VITAM).
Claude Bacque Dion, MA
Coordonnatrice scientifique COMPASS-Québec.
Rabi Joël Gansaonré, MSc
Doctorant, Département de médecine sociale et préventive, Faculté de médecine, Université Laval;
Gestionnaire et analyste de données COMPASS-Québec.
Scott T Leatherdale, PhD
Investigateur principal, Projet COMPASS-Canada;
Professeur agrégé, School of Public Health and Health Systems, University of Waterloo, ON, Canada.
François Desbiens, MD, MPH
Professeur de clinique, Département de médecine sociale et préventive, Faculté de Médecine, Université Laval.
Août 2020

Financement
COMPASS-Québec bénéficie d’octrois de recherche et du soutien du Ministère de la Santé et des Services Sociaux, Gouvernement du Québec, de l’Université Waterloo (Santé Canada – Instituts de Recherche en santé du Canada) et de la Direction régionale de santé publique de la Capitale-Nationale.

Ce rapport présente les résultats de l’étude COMPASS-Québec 2020 réalisée dans 29 écoles secondaires de l’Est-du-Québec. COMPASS est un projet longitudinal multicentrique sur les réalités adolescentes au Canada. Il s’agit d’une des plus grandes plateformes populationnelles longitudinales sur la santé des adolescents dans le monde.

Le volet québécois associe des chercheurs de l’Université Laval, les milieux scolaires et les Directions régionales de santé publique de la Capitale-Nationale, de Chaudière-Appalaches et du Saguenay-Lac-Saint-Jean1.

La ronde d’enquête de 2020 a été réalisée en mai-juin 2020, après la mise en oeuvre des mesures de confinement et la fermeture des écoles. La méthodologie de l’étude a été adaptée de manière à intégrer un volet « COVID-19 » destiné à mieux comprendre l’incidence de la pandémie sur les adolescents et assister le milieu scolaire et les équipes de santé publique dans la mise en oeuvre d’interventions de prévention-promotion adaptées à leurs besoins.

Les questions en lien avec la COVID-19 ont porté sur les cinq sphères suivantes :

  1. Connaissances de la COVID-19 et des gestes barrières;
  2. Attitudes vis-à-vis des mesures de prévention;
  3. Degré d’adoption des mesures de prévention recommandées;
  4. Degré d’adaptation à la situation créée par le confinement et la fermeture des écoles;
  5. Incidence de la COVID-19 sur la vie de tous les jours;
  6. Conséquences de la COVID-19 sur le bien-être, la consommation de substances psychoactives et la santé mentale.

La participation des écoles et des jeunes répondants à l’étude est volontaire. Tous les élèves de l’école sont invités à répondre aux questionnaires annuels. Plus de 6000 adolescents ont complété l’enquête en ligne. La révision des modalités du projet COMPASS et le contenu des questionnaires ont été approuvés par les comités d’éthique de référence.

L’échantillon comprend 6052 répondants (61% filles et 39% garçons, âge moyen de 15,8 ans). Le taux de refus actif à participer à l’enquête est de 1%. La proportion moyenne de répondants par école participante est de 43%. Les données ont été pondérées pour refléter les caractéristiques de la population à l’étude.

D’ici la rentrée scolaire, l’équipe COMPASS Québec fournira à chaque école participante un portrait des réponses des élèves de leur établissement. Le présent rapport permet de disposer d’une vue d’ensemble des réponses obtenues dans les écoles participantes. Les résultats reflètent la réalité des adolescents des écoles participantes à l’enquête COMPASS. Par conséquent, ceux-ci ne sont pas forcément représentatifs de la réalité de toutes les écoles.

Connaissances de la covid-19 et des gestes barrières

Proportion de jeunes ayant déclaré croire que:

  • se laver les mains vigoureusement prévient la transmission du virus : 73%
  • la COVID-19 est une maladie respiratoire infectieuse causée par une bactérie : 55%
  • les symptômes apparaissent entre 2 et 14 jours après exposition : 67%
  • la COVID-19 peut être transmise d’une personne à l’autre par contact de gouttelettes : 72%
  • la COVID-19 peut être transmise en touchant quelque chose/quelqu’un contaminé, puis en touchant son visage : 89%
  • l’utilisation d’une solution hydro-alcoolique (Purell©) pour le lavage des mains prévient la transmission du virus : 59%
  • lorsqu’une personne tousse, l’utilisation d’un masque peut réduire la transmission par gouttelettes : 67%
  • les individus infectés par la COVID-19 présentent toujours des symptômes : 5%
  • la COVID-19 est seulement dangereuse pour les personnes âgées : 12%
  • la COVID-19 représente peu de risques de complications pour les jeunes : 78%

Pour faire face à la Covid-19

Proportion de jeunes ayant déclaré :

  • être restés en contact avec leurs amis en ligne : 63%
  • avoir mangé de la nourriture de type « restauration rapide » : 14%
  • avoir fait de l’exercice : 51%
  • avoir communiqué avec des professionnels de la santé mentale : 3%
  • avoir rencontré leurs amis à l’extérieur : 28%
  • avoir essayé d’aider autrui : 19%
  • avoir gardé un horaire régulier : 30%
  • avoir passé du temps avec leur famille : 46%
  • avoir étudié ou fait des travaux scolaires : 57%
  • avoir passé du temps sur leurs écrans : 63%
  • avoir fumé des cigarettes : 1%
  • avoir vapoté : 6%
  • avoir consommé du cannabis : 2%
  • avoir consommé de l’alcool : 7%

Adoption des mesures préventives

Proportion de jeunes ayant déclaré :

  • avoir nettoyé/désinfecté les objets souvent touchés : 73%
  • avoir nettoyé leurs mains plus souvent qu’à l’habitude : 94%
  • avoir pris au sérieux les mesures gouvernementales pour diminuer la propagation de la COVID-19 : 95%
  • avoir annulé ou déplacé des sorties : 83%
  • avoir discuté des mesures préventives : 74%
  • avoir discuté des gestes à poser en cas d’infection : 64%
  • avoir évité les endroits achalandés : 89%

Effets du confinement

Proportion de jeunes ayant déclaré une augmentation :

  • de leurs communications en ligne avec leurs amis : 63%
  • de leur temps d’écran : 75%
  • de leur niveau d’activité physique : 30%
  • de leur temps de sommeil : 38%
  • de leur usage de cigarettes : 1%
  • de leur usage de cigarette électronique : 5%
  • de leur consommation d’alcool : 9%
  • de leur consommation de cannabis : 2%

Proportion de jeunes ayant déclaré :

  • avoir eu peur de prendre du retard dans leurs apprentissages scolaires : 69%
  • s’être bien entendu avec leur famille : 96%
  • s’être sentis nerveux en pensant aux circonstances du moment : 44%
  • s’être sentis inquiets pour leur propre santé ou celle de leur famille : 73%
  • s’être sentis inquiets quant à la situation financière familiale : 29%

Proportion de jeunes ayant déclaré une augmentation :

  • de leur niveau d’ennui : 67%
  • de leur niveau de stress : 25%
  • de leur solitude : 50%
  • de leur niveau de stress : 25%
  • de leur niveau d’anxiété : 24%

Différences selon le genre

Proportion de filles :

  • ayant déclaré qu’en cas
    de toux, l’utilisation d’un
    masque prévient la transmission
    par gouttelettes : 72%
  • ayant déclaré que se laver
    les mains prévient la transmission
    du virus : 78%
  • ayant déclaré que les gens
    infectés par la COVID-19
    présentent toujours des
    symptômes : 5%
  • ayant déclaré que la
    COVID-19 représente peu
    de risque de complications
    pour les jeunes : 77%
  • ayant nettoyé leurs
    mains plus souvent qu’à
    l’habitude : 96%
  • ayant pris au sérieux les
    mesures gouvernementales
    pour diminuer la propagation
    de la COVID-19 : 97%
  • ayant déclaré une augmentation
    de leur temps d’écran
    récréatif : 73%
  • ayant déclaré une
    augmentation de leur niveau
    d’activité physique: 32%
  • ayant déclaré une
    augmentation de leur
    temps de sommeil : 40%
  • ayant déclaré une
    augmentation de leur
    usage de cigarette : 1%
  • ayant déclaré une
    augmentation de leur
    usage de cigarette
    électronique : 5%
  • ayant déclaré une
    augmentation de leur
    consommation d’alcool : 10%
  • ayant déclaré une augmentation
    de leur consommation
    de cannabis : 2%
  • ayant déclaré une
    augmentation de leur
    solitude : 55%
  • ayant déclaré une
    augmentation de leur
    anxiété : 31%

Proportion de garçons :

  • ayant déclaré qu’en cas
    de toux, l’utilisation d’un
    masque prévient la transmission
    par gouttelettes : 64%
  • ayant déclaré que se laver
    les mains prévient la transmission
    du virus : 69%
  • ayant déclaré que les gens
    infectés par la COVID-19
    présentent toujours des
    symptômes : 6%
  • ayant déclaré que la
    COVID-19 représente peu
    de risque de complications
    pour les jeunes : 79%
  • ayant nettoyé leurs
    mains plus souvent qu’à
    l’habitude : 93%
  • ayant pris au sérieux les
    mesures gouvernementales
    pour diminuer la propagation
    de la COVID-19 : 94%
  • ayant déclaré une augmentation
    de leur temps d’écran
    récréatif : 78%
  • ayant déclaré une
    augmentation de leur niveau
    d’activité physique : 27%
  • ayant déclaré une
    augmentation de leur
    temps de sommeil : 37%
  • ayant déclaré une
    augmentation de leur
    usage de cigarette : 1%
  • ayant déclaré une
    augmentation de leur
    usage de cigarette
    électronique : 5%
  • ayant déclaré une
    augmentation de leur
    consommation d’alcool : 8%
  • ayant déclaré une augmentation
    de leur consommation
    de cannabis : 2%
  • ayant déclaré une
    augmentation de leur
    solitude : 43%
  • ayant déclaré une
    augmentation de leur
    anxiété : 15%
 

Différences selon le niveau de favorisation matérielle familiale

Proportion de jeunes issus d’un
milieu familial moins favorisé :

  • ayant déclaré qu’en cas
    de toux, l’utilisation d’un
    masque prévient la transmission
    par gouttelettes : 80%
  • ayant déclaré que se laver
    les mains prévient la transmission
    du virus : 86%
  • ayant déclaré que les gens
    infectés par la COVID-19
    présentent toujours des
    symptômes : 7%
  • ayant déclaré que la
    COVID-19 représente peu
    de risque de complications
    pour les jeunes : 77%
  • ayant nettoyé leurs
    mains plus souvent qu’à
    l’habitude : 93%
  • ayant pris au sérieux les
    mesures gouvernementales
    pour diminuer la propagation
    de la COVID-19 : 96%
  • ayant déclaré une augmentation
    de leur temps d’écran
    récréatif : 83%
  • ayant déclaré une
    augmentation de leur niveau
    d’activité physique : 26%
  • ayant déclaré une
    augmentation de leur
    temps de sommeil : 36%
  • ayant déclaré une
    augmentation de leur
    usage de cigarette : 1%
  • ayant déclaré une
    augmentation de leur
    usage de cigarette
    électronique : 6%
  • ayant déclaré une
    augmentation de leur
    consommation d’alcool : 6%
  • ayant déclaré une augmentation
    de leur consommation
    de cannabis : 3%
  • ayant déclaré une
    augmentation de leur
    solitude : 52%
  • ayant déclaré une
    augmentation de leur
    anxiété : 29%

Proportion de jeunes issus d’un
milieu familial plus favorisé :

  • ayant déclaré qu’en cas
    de toux, l’utilisation d’un
    masque prévient la transmission
    par gouttelettes : 81%
  • ayant déclaré que se laver
    les mains prévient la transmission
    du virus : 88%
  • ayant déclaré que les gens
    infectés par la COVID-19
    présentent toujours des
    symptômes : 6%
  • ayant déclaré que la
    COVID-19 représente peu
    de risque de complications
    pour les jeunes : 78%
  • ayant nettoyé leurs
    mains plus souvent qu’à
    l’habitude : 95%
  • ayant pris au sérieux les
    mesures gouvernementales
    pour diminuer la propagation
    de la COVID-19 : 95%
  • ayant déclaré une augmentation
    de leur temps d’écran
    récréatif : 84%
  • ayant déclaré une
    augmentation de leur niveau
    d’activité physique : 31%
  • ayant déclaré une
    augmentation de leur
    temps de sommeil : 38%
  • ayant déclaré une
    augmentation de leur
    usage de cigarette : 1%
  • ayant déclaré une
    augmentation de leur
    usage de cigarette
    électronique : 5%
  • ayant déclaré une
    augmentation de leur
    consommation d’alcool : 10%
  • ayant déclaré une augmentation
    de leur consommation
    de cannabis : 2%
  • ayant déclaré une
    augmentation de leur
    solitude : 50%
  • ayant déclaré une
    augmentation de leur
    anxiété : 22%
 

 

Points saillants

Connaissances, attitudes, pratiques

  1. Les adolescents ont une bonne connaissance de la COVID-19 et des mesures de protection.
    • Ils savent en majorité qu’il est possible d’être atteint de la maladie tout en restant asymptomatique.
    • Ils connaissent les principaux modes de transmission et les mesures de protection efficace comme le lavage des mains, le port du masque et l’utilisation de solutions hydro-alcoolique
  2. Les adolescents ne banalisent pas les conséquences de la maladie.
    • Ils se disent en majorité préoccupés par leur santé et celle des membres de leur famille, et soucieux de ne pas prendre du retard dans leurs apprentissages scolaires. La moitié sont nerveux quand ils pensent à la situation actuelle.
  3. Les adolescents adoptent les mesures de prévention recommandées.
    • L’immense majorité dit prendre au sérieux les mesures dictées par les autorités. Les répondants évitent les endroits achalandés, annulent ou déplacent leurs sorties; ils se lavent les mains plus souvent et nettoient ou désinfectent les objets souvent touchés. Plus des deux tiers discutent avec leur famille, leurs amis ou des professionnels de la santé des mesures de prévention.

Impacts, adaptation, résilience

  1. Le confinement affecte fortement la vie des adolescents, mais tous ne réagissent pas de la même façon.
    • La majorité augmente son temps d’écran et les échanges en ligne avec les amis. Plusieurs peinent à conserver un horaire régulier. Certains font davantage d’exercice, d’autres moins. Un répondant sur deux s’est senti plus seul, les deux tiers ont vu leur niveau d’ennui augmenter. Les trois quarts des adolescents indiquent que leur anxiété n’a pas augmenté. Toutefois, certains groupes semblent avoir été davantage affectés. L’anxiété est plus prévalente chez les filles et les jeunes vivant dans des familles moins favorisées.
  2. Les adolescents s’adaptent généralement bien à la vie en confinement.
    • Les répondants disent en majorité bien s’entendre avec leur famille pendant le confinement et maintenir des liens avec leurs amis. La plupart continuent à étudier régulièrement. Un adolescent sur cinq se mobilise pour aider sa communauté.
  3. La consommation de substances psychoactives chez les adolescents n’augmente pas, comme on pouvait le craindre, en période de confinement.
    • Ni la consommation d’alcool ni celle de tabac, de cannabis ou de cigarette électronique n’a augmenté de manière tangible durant la période de confinement.

Les adolescents ont une bonne connaissance de la COVID-19 et des mesures de protection, ils paraissent en majorité responsables et respectueux des mesures de précaution mises en place. Ils ont été sensiblement affectés par la vie en confinement. Leurs réponses suggèrent qu’ils ont en majorité su s’y adapter.

Les résultats préliminaires présentés dans ce portrait sont observés avec régularité dans les 29 écoles participantes des trois zones d’étude. L’équipe COMPASS-Québec approfondira dans les mois à venir l’examen des besoins et des réponses des jeunes participants à l’enquête. Elle s’attachera notamment à rechercher des formes de vulnérabilités que ne révèlerait pas un portrait d’ensemble de la situation.

Références

1 COMPASS Health Canada : https://uwaterloo.ca/compass-system/compass-system-projects/compass-health-canada