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Thursday, December 13, 2018 — 2:30 PM EST

Neil Turok, Perimeter Institute

Observations reveal the cosmos to be astonishingly simple, and yet deeply puzzling, on the largest accessible scales. Why is it so nearly symmetrical? Why is there a cosmological constant (or dark energy) and what fixes its value? How did everything we see emerge from a singular “point” in the past?

Friday, December 14, 2018 — 1:15 PM EST

Wavelength selective thermal emitters using nitride quantum wells and photonic crystals

Dr. Dongyeon Daniel Kang, Kyoto University

Wavelength selective thermal emitters are highly desired for the development of the compact/energy-efficient spectroscopic sensing systems capable of detecting various gases such as COx, CH4, and NOx, which are strongly needed in environmental science, medical care, and other industrial applications. In addition, for the latter applications, dynamic control of thermal emission intensity is important for such emitters because synchronous detection can increase the signal-to-noise ratio significantly.

Friday, January 11, 2019 — 1:15 PM EST

Crafting high-dimensional tools for photonic quantum networks with tailored nonlinear optics

John Donohue, Institute for Quantum Computing

The time-frequency degree of freedom of light offers an intrinsically high-dimensional encoding space which is naturally compatible with waveguide devices and fiber infrastructure. However, coherent manipulation and measurement the information-carrying modes presents a challenge due to the sub-picosecond timescales inherent to downconversion-based photon sources. In this talk, I will discuss methods based on ultrafast pulse shaping and sum-frequency generation to address these temporal modes.

Friday, January 18, 2019 — 12:00 PM EST

Speaker: Neil Henderson

Abstract: The patent system provides a monopoly in return for disclosure of new technology. The disclosures (patent applications) are published and classified by technology to provide an extensive global resource available on line. Want to know how many patent applications Apple has for quantum cryptography? Who else is working in your area ? Does anyone hold a dominant position or are the rights widely distributed?

Friday, January 25, 2019 — 12:00 PM EST

Speaker: Heather Hoff

Abstract: Software is a key asset of any new business. How do you protect the results of weeks or months of hard labour? Who owns the software and how do I mange its development to ensure its inherent value is maintained? Should I use Open Source, or even contribute to Open Source? What are the benefits and how does this measure up against the risks?

Monday, January 28, 2019 — 2:30 PM EST

Ken Andersen, Neutron Instruments Division, European Spallation Source ERIC

Friday, February 8, 2019 — 12:00 PM EST

Speaker: Viona M. Duncan

Abstract: We all want to be the nice guy, but we do not want to finish last. How should we respect the IP of others, particularly confidential information and what should we expect of others when we provide confidential information to them? Simple steps that can be taken to meet obligations and preserve confidentiality will be discussed. You may also have obligations to funding agencies and the University. The UW IP policy will be discussed along with issues of ownership and employee confidentiality.

Monday, February 11, 2019 — 2:30 PM EST

Gui-Lu Long
Beijing National Research Center for Information Science and Technology; Tsinghua University; Beijing Academy of Quantum Information

Quantum computer computes with the superposition of quantum states, and processes quantum parallelism. In this keynote talk, after briefly introducing the principle, and the current status of quantum hardware development, I will concentrate on the quantum algorithms, notably the Shor and Grover algorithm.

Tuesday, May 14, 2019 — 12:00 PM EDT

Speaker: Thomas K. Hunter and Neil Henderson

Abstract:

A lot of different concepts and possibilities have been discussed. The final session will recap those and put them in perspective, with emphasis on the relevance to a "typical" university start up and the people involved.


This is the final lecture in the CryptoWorks21 Intellectual Property (IP) Management Lunch and Learn Lecture Series. Knowledgeable speakers will give in-depth presentations that build on previous sessions.

Monday, May 27, 2019 (all day) to Friday, June 7, 2019 (all day)
Undergraduate School on Experimental Quantum Information Processing logo

Join us at the Institute for Quantum Computing for a two-week introduction to the theoretical and experimental study of quantum information processing.

During the Undergraduate School on Experimental Quantum Information Processing (USEQIP) will be exposed to lectures and experiments on the following topics and more.

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Educational programs

QKD - Quantum Key Distribution Summer School

USEQIP - Undergraduate School on Experimental Quantum Information Processing

QCSYS - Quantum Cryptography School for Young Students

Quantum Innovators logo