Wednesday, November 25, 2009

The latest issue of Nature praises the Institute for Quantum Computing (IQC) for "tackling the broad questions in an exploding field" of science.

The article focuses on IQC's leading-edge advancements in Quantum Information Science, a field that "blends physics, math and computer science in ways that, just 25 years ago, were unknown or deemed irrelevant," writes Nature contributor Eric Hand. Titled "Quantum Possibilities," the article examines the enormous growth ahead in the field of quantum information processing, including a plan for IQC to double in size over the next several years.

IQC Director Raymond Laflamme says in the article that he seeks out top scholars from a variety of disciplines when recruiting researchers and students for the institute. "My advice would be to be exceedingly good, but have a broad mind," Laflamme says.

The article also features other IQC researchers, including PhD student Chris Erven and postdoctoral fellow Bill Coish, both of whom see enormous potential in their still-young field of study. "It's a little different from other fields, where the founders have been dead for 300 years," says Erven.

To read the full article, go to Nature online.


About IQC: Founded in 2002, the mission of the Institute for Quantum Computing (IQC) is to aggressively explore and advance the application of quantum mechanical systems to a vast array of relevant information processing techniques.

A part of the University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ont., Canada, IQC creates a truly unique environment fostering cutting-edge research and collaboration between researchers in the areas of computer, engineering, mathematical and physical sciences.

At the time of this release, IQC has 17 faculty members, 22 postdoctoral fellows and over 55 students and research assistants, as well as a support staff of 18.

The Institute for Quantum Computing acknowledges the support of the Government of Canada through Industry Canada and the Government of Ontario through the Ministry of Research and Innovation.

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