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Solar heat gain in the Optometry building: An evaluation of retrofit sun controls

TitleSolar heat gain in the Optometry building: An evaluation of retrofit sun controls
Publication TypeMiscellaneous
Year of Publication1990
AuthorsEnglish, M. W.
Keywordsenergy
Abstract

Optometry school administrative staff at the University of Waterloo (UW) complain that interior office temperatures are uncomfortably warm during the summer months. Solar radiation is passing through windows in the south and east-facing administrative offices and being trapped inside as heat. The Optometry building’s Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning system (HVAC) is attempting to control uncomfortable solar-induced temperatures in the offices, but by doing so is only chilling shaded portions of the building while still leaving the offices uncomfortably warm. This report evaluates four retrofit sun controls – awnings, venetian blinds, solar-backed blinds, and window films – as their ability to inhibit solar thermal transmission through windows, their requirements for purchased operational energy, and their relative costs. Window films proved to be the most effective control for stopping solar radiation from reaching interior spaces. This retrofit control is also the least expensive of the four methods to implement. It is recommended that the University see to it that a window film be installed on Optometry’s third floor, south and east-perimeter windows… For full text, please e-mail sustainability@uwaterloo.ca