Welcome to Physics & Astronomy

The Physics & Astronomy Department, situated at the heart of North America’s Quantum Valley, Canada’s technology hub, is located an hour south-west of Toronto. Waterloo is like no other place in the world to study physics. Come to Waterloo to study quantum information, holographic landscapes, and supermassive black holes. Create exotic materials, study laser optics, and build bio-sensors. The Physics & Astronomy department is your link to the Institute of Quantum Computing and the Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics.  

Join our community. Study with some the best physicists in the world. 

Be inspired. Inspire us.  

Come to Waterloo!

  1. Apr. 20, 2017Richard Epp and Michael Beazely recognized for Excellence in Science TeachingMichael Beazely and Richard Epp

    Excellence in teaching is both a tradition and a core mission of the University of Waterloo’s Faculty of Science. Each year the Faculty of Science celebrates this dedication and superior teaching calibre by selecting up to two instructors to receive its highest teaching honour: the Excellence in Science Teaching Award (ESTA).

  2. Apr. 20, 2017Raymond Laflamme recognized for ground-breaking contributions to quantum researchRaymond Laflamme

    The Canadian Association of Physicists (CAP) and the Centre de recherches mathématiques (CRM) have awarded Raymond Laflamme, Professor of Physics & Astronomy and Executive Director of the Institute for Quantum Computing (IQC) at the University of Waterloo, the 2017 CAP-CRM Prize in Theoretical and Mathematical Physics. The CAP-CRM prize recognizes research excellence in Canada.

  3. Apr. 12, 2017Waterloo researchers capture first "image" of a dark matter web that connects galaxiesDark matter filaments bridge the space between galaxies in this false colour map.

    Astrophysicists at the University of Waterloo have been able to capture the first composite image of a dark matter bridge that connects galaxies together.

    The composite image, which combines a number of individual images, confirms predictions that galaxies across the universe are tied together through a cosmic web connected by dark matter that has until now remained unobservable.

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QS World University Rankings by subject 2017 TOP 150

Meet our people

Norbert Lütkenhaus

Norbert Lütkenhaus

Professor

On sabbatical until December 31, 2017

Professor Lütkenhaus' research group explores the interface between quantum communication theory and quantum optical implementations. They translate between abstract protocols (described by qubits) and physical implementations (described for example by laser pulses); they benchmark implementations to properly characterize quantum advantage and exploit quantum mechanical structures for use in quantum communication.