Kai-Min Chung: Multi-Source and Network Extractors in the Presence of Quantum Side InformationExport this event to calendar

Thursday, October 23, 2014 — 12:00 PM to 1:00 PM EDT

Kai-Min Chung, Institute of Information Science, Academia Sinica, Taiwan

With the rapid advance of quantum technology, it may become a real
threat that an adversary can take advantage of quantum side information
at hand to break security. In this talk, we consider the problem of
multi-source randomness extraction in the presence of a quantum
adversary, who collects quantum side information from several initially
independent classical random sources. The goal is then to extract almost
uniform bits even given the side information. This is a natural
generalization of the much studied problem of (single source) seeded
randomness extraction against quantum side information. However, new
challenges arise in multi-source settings:

- As pointed out by [Kasher-Kempe, Theory of Computing'12], there may be potential entanglement among quantum side information; as such, it is
not a prior clear under what conditions do quantum multi-source
extractors exist.

- In a cryptographic setting where sources are held privately by
individual (potentially malicious) players with the goal of extracting
private uniform randomness throguh public communication (this is called
network extractors), the (protocol) adversary can use the quantum side
information to make rushing choices of faulty players' messages, which
may cause complicated global correlations.

In this talk, I will explain these interesting phenomenons and present
generic techniques to deal with these challenges. As our results, we
identify a general model of quantum side information that subsumes the
existing models, and obtain extractors in this model with parameters
matching the best known constructions (without quantum side information) for multi-source and network extractors.

Location 
QNC - Quantum Nano Centre
1102
200 University Avenue West

Waterloo, ON N2L 3G1
Canada

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