Research stories

Wednesday, January 12, 2022

CBD might help prime cells against COVID

Synthetic cannabidiol, a non-psychoactive compound also found in the cannabis plant, appears to prime the innate immune system of cells, potentially offering protection against pathogens such as SARS-CoV-2.

Tuesday, February 19, 2019

How to make the pushup work for you

The pushup is a highly adaptable exercise that can be tailored to help individuals with specific needs, say a team of UWaterloo researchers who studied a modified pushup, called a ‘pushup plus.’

Wednesday, October 11, 2017

Aging slows perception of falls

Seniors need twice as long as young adults to realize they are falling, a delay that puts them at increased risk for serious injury, according to a new study from the University of Waterloo.

University of Waterloo researchers have created a tool aimed at decreasing the rate of malnutrition in hospitals. Known as the Mealtime Audit Tool (MAT), it will help dietitians, doctors and nurses identify why a third of patients in acute care settings don’t eat the food on their trays.

Taking certain omega-3 fatty acid supplements during pregnancy can reduce the risk of childhood asthma by almost one third, according to a new study from the Copenhagen Prospective Studies on Asthma in Childhood (COPSAC) and the University of Waterloo.

To uncover just what makes Kilganon such an athletic outlier, Cannon is using state-of-the-art motion capture and electromyography technology to measure muscle activation and joint angles where he suspects they matter the most—not in the legs, but around the spine and hips.

A high proportion of older adults entering long-term care homes in Ontario are B12 deficient, with more developing deficiencies over the course of their first year in residence, according to research from the University of Waterloo.

Investing in biomechanical assessments and revamping strength training programs is the best way to keep major league baseball pitchers off the disabled list, according to research out of the University of Waterloo’s Department of Kinesiology.

The study, published in Psychosomatic Medicine: Journal of Biobehavioral Medicine, is the first to conclusively link reduced activity in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex with weakened self-control around tasty but unhealthy snacks.

A leading biomechanics researcher, Clark Dickerson uses mathematical algorithms to study shoulder movement and reduce injuries in the workplace—a specialized field that has high profile clients, including North America’s leading automotive manufacturers, lining up for consultation.