Welcome to Biology at Waterloo

Biology is the study of living organisms: their structure, function, organization, origin, and evolution.

As a biologist, you’ll have career options that span a wide range of professions, including laboratory and field research, environmental assessment, the health professions, education, and industry. By choosing one of our areas of specialization, such as Animal Physiology, Ecology and Environmental Biology, Microbiology, Molecular Biology and Biotechnology, or Plant Biology, you can better prepare yourself for these exciting career opportunities.

Our Biology program is versatile, allowing you to complement your Genetics, Cell Biology, Physiology, Ecology, Plant Biology, and Human Anatomy courses with studies from the arts, humanities, languages, and mathematics areas. Related labs, tutorial sessions, and field trips provide hands-on experience in a wide range of biological disciplines.

The Department of Biology offers undergraduate degrees in Bioinformatics, Biomedical Sciences (formerly Pre-Optometry/Pre-Health), Honours Biochemistry, Honours Biochemistry/Biotechnology (Regular and Co-op), Honours Environmental Sciences (Ecology Specialization) and Honours Biology (Regular and Co-op). View the degrees and programs. More information about our graduate programs is available on our graduate program site.

Learn more about the Department of Biology's vision/strategic plan.

  1. Jan. 10, 2020#StrongerTogether through Storytelling – Catching up with Professor Kirsten Müller after Homeward Bound
    Orca whale swimming amongst floating ice

    Antarctica is a cold, mostly barren continent, defined by its isolation and snow. It is also a place that has been set aside for peace and science. The challenges of this desolate and harsh environment provide the necessary surroundings to foster teamwork and collaboration for those living and researching there.

  2. Dec. 18, 2019Natural causes are the key driver of change in Athabasca Delta flood patterns, research shows
    Athabasca Delta aerial view

    Natural environmental processes—not upstream energy projects—are the primary cause of changing flood patterns in Alberta’s Athabasca Delta, new research shows.

    The research also shows there is no evidence to support the perception that energy projects have increased the amount of metal pollutants in the delta ecosystem.

  3. Dec. 11, 2019Waterloo’s synthetic biology iGEM team awarded silver standing at annual international competition
    iGEM lab team in lab coats

    Each year since 2005, a group of students from the University of Waterloo has been embracing the challenging, but rewarding world of synthetic biology, problem solving and researching for the iGEM (International Genetically Engineered Machine) competition. This competition brings together teams from countries around the world to showcase projects, and learn from each other at an annual conference.

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