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A blog written by quantum researchers for quantum researchers and those interested in their work.

Launching QUANTUM: The Exhibition

Special guests at the launch of QUANTUM: The Exhibition holding a sign with the hashtag #quantumkw

On August 30, Martin Laforest wrote a blog post about how to create a 4,000 square foot museum exhibition about an invisible science. That exhibition, QUANTUM: The Exhibition, came to life at THEMUSEUM for an invitation-only premiere on October 13, 2016 and then for the general public the next day.

USEQIP students take on the IBM Quantum Experience

Emily Tyhurst

The first time that the IBM Quantum Experience was used as a classroom educational tool was June 7 at the Institute for Quantum Computing (IQC).

What I left with from RQI-N 2016

The IQC recently hosted a conference on Relativistic Quantum Information (RQI). My research falls within this field, which is a relatively-new, but quickly-expanding field which exists at the intersection of quantum information and relativity. By utilizing tools from these fields, RQI provides insights into the nature of gravity and the structure of spacetime, as well as how relativity can affect quantum information tasks.

When quantum correlations need a helping hand

Imagine you have a box with some switches and knobs, which displays a message on its screen every time you press the big red button that says "press me".

My experience with the IBM Quantum Experience

On Tuesday, June 7, 24 students attending the Undergraduate School for Experimental Quantum Information Processing (USEQIP) at the Institute for Quantum Computing (IQC) used the IBM Quantum Experience to test algorithms that they were learning about in the classroom.

This was the first time that the platform was used as an educational tool in a classroom. Here's what one student, Michael Wolfe, an undergraduate student at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, had to say about the experiment:

Tomography turns out to be harder than expected

Recently, I had a very interesting discussion with Joel Klassen, one of the PhD students here at the Institute for Quantum Computing (IQC). He's been working on a problem that is closely related to that of quantum marginals.

Detecting Gravitational Waves. Can Quantum Mechanics Help?

Massive bodies warp spacetime

Secrets can be very hard to keep. The thought of having to wait five months to be able to talk about what is arguably the biggest scientific discovery in a century is incomprehensible. But for every member of the LIGO Scientific Collaboration (LSC), it was absolutely essential that nobody let the cat out the bag (or should that be box?).

Quantum Computational Intelligence

Imagine solving mathematical problems where you could use the full physical range of computational possibilities within the laws of the universe, and be inspired by the sublime algorithmic intelligence of the human brain. This is precisely why the emerging field of quantum machine learning (QML) has received so much recent attention. In this blog post, we’d like to discuss the fundamental ideas and applied value of machine learning to computation in general, and then contextualize these ideas in a new way within the paradigm of quantum computation.

Diary of a quantum engineer

Quantum engineering is a term that is becoming increasingly common across research groups and industry alike. One example, which is the subject of this blog post, is the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) Centre for Doctoral Training in Quantum Engineering, based at the University of Bristol. It is a centre that I myself have been trained in, and currently am part of. But what is a Centre for Doctoral Training (or ‘CDT’ as they are commonly referred to), and what is quantum engineering?

Tomaytos, Tomahtos and Non-local Measurements

A projective measurement of an observable A

One of my discoveries as a physicist was that, despite all attempts at clarity, we still have different meanings for the same words and use different words to refer the the same thing. When Alice says measurement, Bob hears a `quantum to classical channel', but Alice, a hard-core Everettian, does not even believe such channels exist. When Charlie says non-local, he means Bell non-local, but string theorist Dan starts lecturing him about non-local Lagrangian terms and violations of causality. And when I say non-local measurements, you hear ????

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Educational programs

QKD - Quantum Key Distribution Summer School

USEQIP - Undergraduate School on Experimental Quantum Information Processing

QCSYS - Quantum Cryptography School for Young Students

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