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WIN Seminar Series: Adventures with Chiral Induced Spin SelectivityExport this event to calendar

Wednesday, February 26, 2020 — 10:30 AM to 11:30 AM EST

The Waterloo Institute for Nanotechnology (WIN) is pleased to present a Seminar Series talk by Professor David H. Waldeck, a distinguished professor at the University of Pittsburgh and Director of the Petersen Institute of NanoScience and Engineering.

Adventures with Chiral Induced Spin Selectivity

Abstract

Professor Waldeck will describe recent studies that investigate the effects of electron spin in electron transfer and electron initiated chemical reactions of supramolecular assemblies and at electrodes. Charge polarization and charge transfer in chiral molecules and assemblies is accompanied by spin polarization and spin transfer, because of the chiral induced spin selectivity (CISS) effect. In the first part of the talk, he will describe the discovery of CISS 1999 and trace our understanding of its basic features through an exposition of key experiments.  In the second part of the talk, he will report on recent studies which show how the CISS effect modulates electron transfer rates in chiral assemblies and how spin-filtered electron transfer can be used to initiate enantioselective electrochemical reactions.

Biography

David WaldeckDavid H. Waldeck obtained a Ph.D. in chemistry from the University of Chicago in 1983 and was an IBM Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of California, Berkeley from 1983 to 1985. In 1985 he began his independent career as an Assistant Professor of Chemistry at the University of Pittsburgh, where he now serves as Professor of Chemistry and Director of the Petersen Institute of NanoScience and Engineering. David is an AAAS Fellow and an APS Fellow. In 2018 he was awarded the Bioelectrochemistry prize from the International Society of Electrochemistry. David’s research program uses methods of spectroscopy, electrochemistry, and microscopy to investigate primary processes in the condensed phase and in nanoscale assemblies. He and his research group are recognized for their studies of charge transfer and charge transport in biomolecular assemblies and redox proteins on electrode surfaces. Currently they are working to elucidate the nature of long-range electron transfer and the chiral induced spin selectivity effect.

Cost 
Free, refreshments provided.
Location 
QNC - Quantum Nano Centre
Room 1501
200 University Avenue West

Waterloo, ON N2L 3G1
Canada

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