University COVID-19 update

COVID-19 continues to change rapidly across the world and we want to take steps to limit the spread and risks of the disease in our community. With this goal in mind, the University is closed for events until further notice. Visit the University's Coronavirus Information website for more information.

The Waterloo Institute for Nanotechnology main office (QNC 3606) is closed until further notice. If you are a student trying to pick up or return a lab/office key, please email asomel@uwaterloo.ca for assistance. All other inquires can be directed to win-office@uwaterloo.ca. For emergencies, contact Campus Police.

News

Tuesday, March 10, 2020

Ontario government awards $3.4 million to Waterloo researchers for infrastructure

Twenty-nine University of Waterloo researchers, including 4 science recipients, 3 of which are members of WIN, will receive $3.4 million from the provincial government to further research innovation in Ontario. 

Thursday, February 20, 2020

WIN Member ranks among world’s top 10 influential analytical scientists

Waterloo Science Professor Janusz Pawliszyn, from the department of Chemistry was named the 9th most influential person in analytical science across the globe by Analytical Scientist’s 201

Tuesday, February 11, 2020

Three WIN Members awarded WIN-MESA+ Seed Funding

Group at MESA+

Congratulations to three WIN members for winning the WIN-MESA+ Seed Funding Award for $75,000 each to support international joint research projects with faculty members from the MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology at the University of Twente, Netherlands.

Tuesday, February 11, 2020

New sensor provides better leak protection in buildings

A new, battery-free sensor can detect water leaks in buildings at a fraction of the cost of existing systems.

The tiny device, developed by researchers at the University of Waterloo, uses nanotechnology to power itself and send an alert to smartphones when exposed to moisture.

By eliminating a battery and related circuitry, researchers estimate their sensor could be commercially produced for $5 each, about a tenth of the cost of current leak detection devices on the market.

Monday, January 27, 2020

Nanotechnology engineering students claim top award at OEC

A nanotechnology engineering undergraduate team won first place at this year’s Ontario Engineering Competition (OEC) in the Innovative Design category.

Hosted by the University of Guelph from January 17 to 19, OEC brought together engineering students from across the province to compete in eight unique challenges designed around the theme of Improve Life.

Friday, January 17, 2020

Faculty of Science Launches Innovation Hub

An exciting and innovative transition has been taking place in the Faculty of Science, and we are now pleased to announce the opening of the Science Innovation Hub!

Friday, January 10, 2020

WIN member, Professor Yeow, elected VP of IEEE Nanotechnology Technical Council

John Yeow, a WIN member and systems design engineering professor, is the new VP of Educational Activities for the IEEE Nanotechnology Technical Council (NTC).

Thursday, January 2, 2020

Math is the new microscope

Breakthroughs in technology and computing are changing the way researchers approach medicine. Early scientists wielded the revolutionary tools of their time, such as the microscope, to understand human health. Today, researchers increasingly use math as a microscope to understand biology and medicine, dictating the need for scientists to navigate between the worlds of computations and medicine comfortably.

Wednesday, December 18, 2019

Fighting HIV with nanomedicine and 3D printing

WIN member Emmanuel Ho, an associate professor at the University of Waterloo School of Pharmacy and an international expert in nanomedicine, is developing a 3D-printed intra-vaginal ring (IVR) that would provide highly precise doses of medication to protect women from getting HIV, the virus that causes AIDS and kills one million people globally each year, according to UNAIDS.
 

Tuesday, December 3, 2019

PhD candidate blends engineering and biology in award-winning research project

When he was a young boy growing up in Burkina Faso, Yannick Traore’s dad didn’t like to buy him toys. Yannick had a habit of taking things apart just to figure out how to put them back together. Even as a child, he needed to understand how things worked.

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