Mechanical and Mechatronics Department Research Seminars

 Seminar Attendance form

|PhD Seminars| MASc Seminars |


ROBOTS THAT LEARN
TO INFLUENCE HUMANS
prof Dylan Losey


Speaker: Prof. Dylan Losey
Virginia Tech, USA
Theme: Robotics, Interaction
--------------------------------------------
Time: 2023-Feb-8, 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm
Zoom Meeting ID: 966 7094 8019 (link)
Passcode: MME2022

Summary: Our society is rapidly developing interactive robots that collaborate with humans, e.g., self-driving
cars near pedestrians, surgical devices with doctors, and assistive arms for disabled adults. The humans who
interact with these systems will not always be experts in robotics: so how should we facilitate mutual
understanding between everyday users and learning agents? My talk will examine this question from two
perspectives: the robot’s and the human’s. From the robot’s point-of-view, I will formalize algorithms that
learn to interpret low-dimensional human inputs for controlling robot arms. From the human’s point-of-view,
I will leverage multimodal feedback to reveal what the robot has learned and when the robot is uncertain.
When viewed together, these perspectives enable robots to learn to influence human partners towards
coordinated and emergent behaviors.

Prof. Dylan Losey is an assistant professor in Mechanical Engineering at Virginia Tech. His research interests
lie at the intersection of human-robot     
interaction, learning, and control.                             
Specifically, he develops algorithms that                    
enable robots to personalize their behavior
for human collaborators. Dylan was
previously a postdoctoral scholar at Stanford
University. He earned his doctoral degree in
Mechanical Engineering from Rice
University in 2018 and his bachelor’s degree
in Mechanical Engineering from Vanderbilt
University in 2014. Dylan has received Best
Paper awards from the Conference on Robot
Learning and the IEEE/ASME Transactions
on Mechatronics.


UWaterloo MME Departmental Seminar Seriesteacher
---------------------------------------------------
New Roles and Tools for Combustion in Battery
Research
Speaker: Prof. Sili Deng
MIT, USA
Theme: Energy, Combustion
--------------------------------------------
Time: 2023-Jan-27, 2:00 pm - 3:00 pm
Seminar location*: Mike & Ophelia Lazaridis Quantum-Nano
Centre (QNC) 1501

Summary: Combustion has played a vital role in energy conversion and can contribute to energy storage and
sustainability by assuming a new role in manufacturing. For example, flame-based spray methods have great potential
in manufacturing lithium-ion battery (LIB) cathode materials due to their features such as continuous, fast, and
scalable operation. By reducing the cost and improving the performance of LIBs, such manufacturing methods will
facilitate their applications in transportation electrification and grid energy storage. In this talk, a flame-assisted spray
pyrolysis technology will be introduced together with examples on utilizing this approach to control the morphology
and performance of LIB cathode materials with incredibly short synthesis time compared to the traditional methods.
On the other hand, applying tools developed in other disciplines to combustion research could provide us new
perspectives and enable new discoveries. I will demonstrate our recently developed Chemical Reaction Neural
Network approach to identify reaction pathways and simultaneously quantify kinetic parameters from data without
any prior knowledge of the chemical system. Specifically, I will discuss the challenges in developing such an approach,
successful case studies in energy conversion and biochemistry, and future opportunities.

Summary: Combustion has played a vital role in energy conversion and can contribute to energy storage and
sustainability by assuming a new role in manufacturing. For example, flame-based spray methods have great potential
in manufacturing lithium-ion battery (LIB) cathode materials due to their features such as continuous, fast, and
scalable operation. By reducing the cost and improving the performance of LIBs, such manufacturing methods will
facilitate their applications in transportation electrification and grid energy storage. In this talk, a flame-assisted spray
pyrolysis technology will be introduced together with examples on utilizing this approach to control the morphology
and performance of LIB cathode materials with incredibly short synthesis time compared to the traditional methods.
On the other hand, applying tools developed in other disciplines to combustion research could provide us new
perspectives and enable new discoveries. I will demonstrate our recently developed Chemical Reaction Neural
Network approach to identify reaction pathways and simultaneously quantify kinetic parameters from data without
any prior knowledge of the chemical system. Specifically, I will discuss the challenges in developing such an approach,
successful case studies in energy conversion and biochemistry, and future opportunities.
Dr. Sili Deng received her doctoral degree in Mechanical and Aerospace
Engineering from Princeton University. After being a postdoctoral scholar in the
Department of Mechanical Engineering at Stanford University, she joined the
Department of Mechanical Engineering at MIT as an assistant professor in 2019.
Her research focuses on energy conversion and storage, specifically, the
fundamental understanding of combustion and emissions, physics-informed datadriven
modeling of reacting flows, carbon-neutral energetic materials, and flame
synthesis of materials for catalysis and energy storage. At MIT, Dr. Deng received
the d’Arbeloff Career Development Chair in 2019 and Class of 1954 Career
Development Chair in 2022. Dr. Deng also received the Bernard Lewis Fellowship
from the Combustion Institute in 2016 and NSF CAREER Award in 2022.
*NOTE: this is a joint seminar with the Waterloo Institute for Nanotechnology (WIN) and will be hosted
in person. Register here for the event: https://uwaterloo.ca/institute-nanotechnology/events/win-andmme-
joint-seminar-new-roles-and-tools-combustion

Please contact the host, Prof. Yue Hu (yue.hu@uwaterloo.ca), if any questions


SIMULATION AND MODELING OF TURBULENT PARTICLE-LADEN FLOWS
Speaker: Prof. Jesse Capecelatro
University of Michigan, USA
Theme: Fluids and Thermal
--------------------------------------------
Time: 2023-Jan-16, 1:00 pm-2:00 pm ETD
Zoom Meeting ID: 789 699 0683 (link) Passcode: MME2023

Abstract:

Many natural and industrial processes involve the flow of solid particles or liquid droplets whose dynamical evolution and morphology are intimately coupled with a carrier gas. The nonlinear and multiscale nature of such flows often precludes a direct analytic or numerical solution, and instead we must turn to simulations that rely on subgrid-scale models. The first part of this talk will focus on the flow physics taking place at the microscale (scale of individual particles). A new stochastic drag formulation will be presented that is designed to capture the effect of particle microstructure on velocity statistics. We will then focus on larger systems containing many interacting particles. I will show how strong interphase coupling spontaneously generates dense clusters that impact the underlying turbulence. The role of clusters on heat transfer under conditions relevant to chemical transformation reactors will also be presented.

Jesse Capecelatro is an Associate Professor in the Departments of Mechanical Engineering and Aerospace Engineering at the University of Michigan. He received a Ph.D. from Cornell in 2014. Prior to joining the University of Michigan in 2016, he was a postdoc at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign. He is a recipient of the NASA Early Stage Innovations Award, NSF CAREER Award, ONR Young Investigator Award, and the ASME Pi Tau Sigma Gold Medal Award. His research is broadly under the realm of fluid mechanics, with an emphasis on multiphase flow, turbulence, reacting flows, and high-performance computing.

Please contact the host, Prof. Zhao Pan (zhao.pan@uwaterloo.ca), if any questions



UWaterloo MME Departmental Seminar Series

brian

GPU Acceleration for Real-Time, Whole-Body, Nonlinear Model Predictive Control

Speaker: Prof. Brian Plancher

Barnard College, Columbia University, USA

Theme: Robotics, Control, Optimization

Time: 2022-Nov-21, 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm

Zoom Meeting ID: 966 7094 8019 (link) Passcode: MME2022

Summary: Whole-body, nonlinear model predictive control (MPC) has been referred to as the "Holy Grail" of robot motion planning and control, as it can enable robots to dynamically compute optimal trajectories and adapt to changes in their environment. Unfortunately, the underlying trajectory optimization algorithms traditionally used to solve these problems are computationally expensive and often too slow to run in real-time. Compounding this issue, the impending end of Moore's Law and the end of Dennard Scaling have led to a utilization wall that limits the performance a single CPU chip can deliver, requiring computer scientists to look beyond the CPU to exploit large-scale parallelism available on alternative computing

platforms such as GPUs. This talk charts a path towards addressing these challenges by exposing, analyzing, and leveraging the structured sparsity and parallelism patterns found in the numerical optimization and rigid body dynamics algorithms commonly used for whole-body, nonlinear MPC. Through careful algorithmic refactoring and re-design, this work exploits these patterns to enable real-time MPC performance through GPU-acceleration.

Prof. Brian Plancher is an Assistant Professor of Computer Science at Barnard College, Columbia University where he leads the Accessible and Accelerated Robotics Lab (A²R Lab). He also co-chairs the Tiny Machine Learning Open Education Initiative (TinyMLedu) and is an associate co-chair for the IEEE RAS TC on Model Based Optimization for Robotics. His research is focused on developing and implementing open- source algorithms for dynamic motion planning and control of robots by exploiting both the mathematical structure of algorithms and the design of computational platforms. As such, his research is at the intersection of Robotics and Computer Architecture, Embedded Systems, Numerical Optimization, and Machine Learning. He also wants to improve the accessibility of STEM education. As such, he researches ways to better understand and improve diversity, equity, inclusion, and belonging in STEM education globally, as well as designs and teaches new interdisciplinary, project-based, open-access courses that lower the barrier to entry of cutting edge topics like robotics and embedded machine learning.

Please contact the host, Prof. Yue Hu (yue.hu@uwaterloo.ca), if any questions

 

TURBULENCE STRUCTURE AND MODELING IN THE FREQUENCY DOMAIN
Speaker: Prof. Tim Colonius
Caltech, USA
Theme: Fluid Mechanics
--------------------------------------------
Time: 2022-Nov-7, 11:00 am-12:00 pm ETD
Zoom Meeting ID: 789 699 0683 (link) Passcode: MME2022

mn

Abstract: Amongst many available data-driven modal decompositions of utility in fluid mechanics, the frequency-domain (spectral) version of the proper orthogonal decomposition (SPOD) plays a special role in the analysis of stationary turbulence. SPOD modes are optimal in expressing structures that evolve coherently in both space and time, and they can be regarded as optimally averaged DMD modes. Importantly, the SPOD spectrum is also related to the resolvent spectrum of the linearized dynamics and examination of the relationships between the SPOD and resolvent modes yields information about how coherent structures are forced by nonlinear interactions amongst coherent and incoherent turbulence. We discuss the application of these tools to analyze and model turbulence in high-speed jets and boundary layers. We highlight recent developments including (a) utilizing eddy-viscosity models in resolvent analysis to enable RANS-based prediction of coherent structures, and (b) nonlinear extensions of resolvent analysis to discover worst-case disturbances for laminar-turbulent transition, and (c) the development fast spatial marching methods for large-scale resolvent problems.
Tim Colonius is the Frank and Ora Lee Marble Professor of Mechanical Engineering at the California Institute of Technology. He received his B.S. from the University of Michigan in 1987 and M.S and Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering from Stanford University in 1988 and 1994, respectively. He and his research team use numerical simulations to study a range of problems in fluid dynamics, including aeroacoustics, flow control, instabilities, shock waves, and bubble dynamics. Prof. Colonius also investigates medical applications of ultrasound and is a member of the Medical Engineering faculty at Caltech. He is a Fellow of the American Physical Society and the Acoustical Society of America. He was the recipient of the 2018 AIAA Aeroacoustics Award, and the 2021 Stanley Corrsin Award from the American Physical Society.


UWaterloo MME Departmental Seminar Series

TURBULENCE STRUCTURE AND MODELING IN THE FREQUENCY DOMAIN

Speaker: Prof. Tim Colonius

Caltech, USA Theme: Fluid MechanicsTime: 2022-Nov-7, 11:00 am-12:00 pm ETD

Zoom Meeting ID: 789 699 0683 (link) Passcode: MME2022

Abstract: Amongst many available data-driven modal decompositions of utility in fluid mechanics, the frequency-domain (spectral) version of the proper orthogonal decomposition (SPOD) plays a special role in the analysis of stationary turbulence. SPOD modes are optimal in expressing structures that evolve coherently in both space and time, and they can be regarded as optimally averaged DMD modes. Importantly, the SPOD spectrum is also related to the resolvent spectrum of the linearized dynamics and examination of the relationships between the SPOD and resolvent modes yields information about how coherent structures are forced by nonlinear interactions amongst coherent and incoherent turbulence. We discuss the application of these tools to analyze and model turbulence in high-speed jets and boundary layers. We highlight recent developments including (a) utilizing eddy-viscosity models in resolvent analysis to enable RANS-based prediction of coherent structures, and (b) nonlinear extensions of resolvent analysis to discover worst-case disturbances for laminar-turbulent transition, and (c) the development fast spatial marching methods for large- scale resolvent problems.

Tim Colonius is the Frank and Ora Lee Marble Professor of Mechanical Engineering at the California Institute of Technology. He received his B.S. from the University of Michigan in 1987 and M.S and Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering from Stanford University in 1988 and 1994, respectively. He and his research team use numerical simulations to study a range of problems in fluid dynamics, including aeroacoustics, flow  control,  instabilities,  shock  waves,  and  bubble dynamics. Prof. Colonius also investigates medical applications of ultrasound and is a member of the Medical Engineering faculty at Caltech. He is a Fellow of the American Physical Society and the Acoustical Society of America. He was the recipient of the 2018 AIAA Aeroacoustics Award, and the 2021 Stanley Corrsin Award from the American Physical Society.

Please contact the host, Prof. Zhao Pan (zhao.pan@uwaterloo.ca), if any questions



COMPUTATIONALLY DESIGN SUSTAINABLE MORPHING MATTER

Speaker: Prof. Lining Yao
Carnegie Mellon University (CMU), USA Theme: Morphing Matter, Sustainability


Time: 2022-Oct-06, 11:00 am - 12:00 pm
Zoom Meeting ID: 966 7094 8019 (link) Passcode: MME2022

Summary: A significant contributor to climate disaster is the way we make, grow and consume 
physical things. Sustainable morphing matter is defined as physical materials and structures that 
dynamically reconfigure in shapes and functions in response to natural and ambient energy stimuli. 
Unlike electronic sensors and motors, the dominant machine components for “motion” and “function” 
in today’s autonomous and robotic systems, sustainable morphing matter systems are often 
biodegradable and triggered by electricity-free energy stimuli, yet programmed to be adaptive, 
responsive, and intelligent. To elaborate many ways bio-inspired and bio- hybrid morphing systems 
can contribute to the global sustainability effort, the director of the Morphing Matter Lab, Dr. 
Lining Yao will present a few morphing systems that hold promise to contribute to sustainable 
agriculture, environmental conservation, and manufacturing.
Prof. Lining Yao is the Cooper-Siegel Assistant Professor of the Human-Computer  Interaction  
Institute  at  Carnegie  Mellon University (CMU), School of Computer Science, directing the 
Morphing Matter Lab (morphingmatter.cs.cmu.edu). Lining also holds courtesy appointments at 
Mechanical Engineering and Material Sciences and Engineering at CMU. Morphing Matter lab develops 
processes, materials, mechanisms, tools, and applications of adaptive, dynamic, and intelligent 
morphing materials from nano to macro scales. Research often combines computational fabrication, 
material engineering, mechanics and geometry studies, as well as human- or nature- centered design 
processes. The mission is to advance both science and society with the design of morphing matter. 
Lining gained her Ph.D. from the MIT Media Lab. She is the co-founder of MorphingMatter4Girls 
Initiative, a Wired UK fellow, an appointed Instructor by the United Nation Industrial Development 
Organization, a CMU Provost's Inclusive Teaching Fellow, and a recipient of the NSF CAREER Award.

Please contact the host, Prof. Yue Hu (yue.hu@uwaterloo.ca), if any questions
 


SECURING CRITICAL MATERIALS FOR EMERGING ENERGY TECHNOLOGIES IN THE U.S.
Speaker: Dr. Chukwunwike (Nwike) Iloeje, Principal Scientist
Energy Systems & Infrastructure Analysis (ESIA) Division
Argonne National Laboratory, U.S.
Theme: Energy, Materials, Manufacturing
--------------------------------------------
Time: 2022-Sept-26, 10:00-11:00 am EST
Zoom Meeting ID: 789 699 0683 (link) Passcode: MME2022

v

 

Summary: Critical materials such as rare earth underpin technologies needed for a decarbonized global economy. Critical materials – like rare earth elements – are essential to emerging energy technologies that underpin the US decarbonization goals. Despite having vast mineral resources, the US has limited operational mining and refining capacity, leading to net import reliance and consequent supply vulnerabilities. Secondary recovery can mitigate the supply risks and enable a circular economy for critical materials. However, feasibility depends on the technical performance, energy, economic and environmental footprint of the recovery technology when deployed at scale.
In this talk, I will give an overview of the challenge of material criticality, and the potential of secondary recovery to mitigate supply risks. Then I will show how we can address the question of feasibility with simulation and mathematical optimization, addressing the problem at various scales from process fundamentals to reverse logistics.
Dr. Nwike Iloeje is a principal scientist in the ESIA division at Argonne, and the strategic analysis group Co-Lead for the DOE-advanced manufacturing office. In his research, he uses computational modeling to explore questions at the intersection of sustainable energy conversion and material transformations, with particular interest in critical materials, carbon capture and utilization. He has a PhD from Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and Bachelors’ from the University of Nigeria, both in Mechanical Engineering.


 

SECURING TWO PROBLEMS IN DATA ASSIMILATION FOR THE SHALLOW WATER EQUATIONS
Speaker: Nicholas Kevlahan
Department of Mathematics and Statistics,
McMaster University
Theme: Fluid Mechanics, Data Science
--------------------------------------------
Time: 2022-Oct-25, 10:00-11:00 am EST
Zoom Meeting ID: 947 9123 3531 (link) Passcode: 998101

nn

Summary: The shallow water equations (SWE) are a widely used model for the propagation of surface waves in oceans, lakes and rivers. Common applications include modelling the propagation of tsunami waves, storm surges and flooding. In this talk we describe two data assimilation problems for the SWE, both based on sparse observations of the free surface height. The goal of the first problem is to reconstruct the initial conditions for a surface wave. In the case of the relatively simple linear one-dimensional problem we prove a theorem that gives sufficient conditions on the number and spacing of the observations that ensure convergence to the true initial conditions. These results are confirmed numerically for the nonlinear equations. We then consider the associated two-dimensional nonlinear problem. We compare observations arranged in straight lines, in a grid, and along concentric circles, and determine the optimal number and configuration of observation points such that convergence to the true initial conditions is achieved. In the second (ill posed) problem our goal is to determine under which conditions observations of the free surface are sufficient to reconstruct the bathymetry to a given accuracy (e.g. sufficient for modelling wave propagation). We use density-based global sensitivity analysis (GSA) to assess the sensitivity of the surface wave and reconstruction error to model parameters and second order adjoint analysis (SOA) to derive the sensitivity of the surface wave error, given the reconstructed bathymetry, to perturbations in the observations.
Nicholas Kevlahan is a Professor in the Department of Mathematics and Statistics at McMaster University. He has a BSc from the University of British Columbia, a PhD from the University of Cambridge and was a Marie Curie post-doctoral fellow at École Normale Supérieure (Paris). He has been an invited professor at Université Grenoble-Alpes, INRIA, École Normale Supérieure (Paris), École Polytechnique (Paris), and a visiting researcher at the University of Cambridge. His interdisciplinary research program is focused on advanced mathematical and computational methods for fluid dynamics problems from physics and engineering. Current research includes developing the WAVETRISK code for dynamically adaptive climate modelling, data assimilation techniques, fluid-structure interaction and compressive sampling. He has an active research group of PhD, MSc and BSc students from a wide diversity of backgrounds.

 

 


 


PhD Seminars

PhD Comprehensive Examination

( Attendance is at the discretion of the supervisor and student who hold the exam)

Olakunle Betiku - Wednesday, January 11, 2023 from 9:30 AM - 12:30 PM, E5-3052 - in person

Title: The Role of Microstructural Modifications in Improving the Mechanical Performance of Resistance Spot Welded Automotive Steels

Supervisor: Elliot Biro

Minghao Ning - Friday, January 13, 2023 trom 9:00 AM to 12:00 PM - remote

Title: A Fast and Safe Motion Planning Method for Autonomous Vehicle Through Point Cloud Based Potential Field

Supervisor: Amir Khajepour

Ahmad Reza Alghooneh  - Monday, January 16, 2023 from 1:00 PM-4:00 PM remote

Title: A Multi-Frame Approach to Radar-camera Fusion for Autonomous Vehicle Object Detection

Supervisor: Amir Khaejpour

Pouya  Panahandeh  - Friday, January 20, 2023 from 1:00 PM to 4:00 PM - remote

Title: Vehicle Navigation Using Graph -Based Method and Game Theory

Supervisors: Amir Khajepour / Baris Fidan

Ali  Gharamohammadi - Thursday, January 26, 2023 from 10:00 AM to 1:00 PM - remote

Title: In-cabin Health Care Monitoring by Sensors 

Supervisors: Amir Khajepour / George Shaker

Nadia Azizi - Tuesday, February 7, 2023 from 9:00 AM to 12:00 PM remote

Title: Laser Powder Bed Fusion of Copper Alloys: From Process Parameter Optimization to Oxidation Analysis

Supervisor: Ehsan Toyserkani

PhD Defense

(Attendance is at the discretion of the supervisor and student who hold the defense)

Alejandro Martinez - Tuesday, January 10, 2023 from 9:00 AM to 12:00 PM online

Title: Monitoring and Control of Metal Additive Manufacturing Processes Using Ultrasound

Supervisor: Ehsan Toyserkani

Francis  Lacombe  - Friday, January 13, 2023 from 1:00 PM to 4:00 PM  E5-3006 in person

Title: Stability of compressible boundary layers in presence of smooth roughness and wall temperature effects 

Supervisor: Jean-Pierre Hickey

Chia-Pei Wang - Friday, January 13, 2023 from 9:00 AM to 12:30 PM - EC4-1104 in person

Title: Virtual Model Building for Multi-Axis Machine Tools using Field Data

Supervisors: Kaan Erkorkmaz / John McPhee

Nivas Ramachandiran - Friday, January 20, 2023 from 1:00 PM to 4:00 PM - remote

Title: Structure Property Correlation in Additive Manufactured Ti - 5553 Component

Supervisors: Adrian Gerlich / Ehsan Toyserkani

Neel Pratik Bhatt - Thursday, February 23, 2023 from 11:30 AM-2:30 PM - remote

Title: Trajectory Prediction of Dynamic Objects in Urban Driving Settings for Autonomous Driving

Supervisors: Amir Khajepour / Ehsan Hashemi

Ali Ghatei Kalashami - Tuesday, February 28, 2023 from 3:00 PM to 6:00 PM - Remote

Title: An integrative investigation of liquid metal embrittlement in the Fe-Zn system: From responsible mechanisms to mitigation strategies

Supervisor: Norman Zhou

Muhammad Shehryar Khan - Wednesday,  March 8, 2023, from 2:00 PM to 5:00 PM remote

Title: Improving the multiscale morphological and mechanical properties of laser welded Al-Si coated ultra-high strength 22MnB5 press-hardened steels 

Supervisor: Norman Zhou / Elliot Biro

Farzaneh Kaji - Thursday, March 16, 2023 from  8:30 AM to 11:30 AM - Remote

Title: In-situ monitoring and intermittent controller for adaptive trajectory generation during laser directed energy

Supervisor: Ehsan Toyserkani

Ehsan Mohammadbagher - Tuesday, March 21, 2023 from 2:30 PM to 5:30 PM - Remote

Title: Efficient Vehicle Self-Localization Using Vector Maps and Multi-Modal Odometry

Supervisors: Amir Khajepour / Ehsan Hashemi

Mobin Khamooshi - Friday, March 24, 2023 from 1:00 PM to 4:00 PM - Remote

Title: Cooperative Vehicle Perception and Localization Using Infrastructure-based Sensor Nodes

Supervisors: Amir Khajepour / Ehsan Hashemi

Ali Shahidi - Tuesday March 28, 2023 from  2:30 PM to 5:30 PM - Remote

Title: MPC Controller Weight Tuning and Real-Time Learning-Based Weight Selection

Supervisor: Amir Khajepour

Sirshendu Misra - Tuesday, April 11, 2023 from 2:00 PM to 5:00 PM  E5-3052   in person

Title: Wetting at Interfaces: From Drops to Microorganisms 

Supervisor: Sushanta Mitra

Zhi Cheng - Tuesday, April 11, 2023 from 1:00 PM to 4:00 PM - Remote

Title: Flow Dynamics and Aeroacoustics of Flow-induced Vibration of Bluff Bodies

Supervisors: Fue-Sang Lien

MASc seminar

Tamuno-Ibim Tolofari - Tuesday December 6th, 2022 from 3-4pm, E5 3006

Title: Characterization of the Mechanical and Microstructural Properties of Thin Non-Orientated Electrical Steel Sheets

Supervisor: Hamid Jahed Motlagh


Stephen Banjo - September 5, 2022, 3:00 PM to 4:30 PM, Online via Teams

Title:  Steam gasification of excavated waste residue (EWR) from a landfill bioreactor operated for 15 years

Supervisor:  Zhongchao Tan


Joel Mills - Aug 16, 2022, 1PM-2PM, E5 3052

Title: Nanostructured catalysts for electrochemical CO2 reduction

Supervisor:  Yimin Wu


Hannah Dinovitzer - Aug. 10, 2022 9:00 – 10:00am, E5 3052

Title:  A hybrid inverse dynamic-neural network approach to lower limb exoskeleton control

Supervisor: Professor Arash Arami


Shawn Tan - August 3, 2022, 9:00 - 10:00am, E5 3052

Title:  impact of platinum nanoparticles size/shape in platinum/carbon catalyst in proton exchange membrane fuel cell

Supervisor:  Xiango Li


Jessica Zhang - Monday, April 11th, 2022 at 10:00AM, E5 3052

Title: Quasi-static, cyclic, and fracture characteristics of thermal sprayed AlSi cylinder bore

Supervisor:  Hamid Jahed Motlagh


Sola Weng, Friday, April 8, 2022, 11:00am – 12:30pm

Abstract title: Recovering Optimal Cost Functions for Natural Walking: From Musculoskeletal Simulation to Exoskeleton Control

Supervisor:  Professor Arash Arami

Link: https://teams.microsoft.com/l/meetup-join/19%3ameeting_MmEyNzYyYmQtNzEyZS00MGQxLTgxMWMtNWMyZjE1ZjNmMThm%40thread.v2/0?context=%7b%22Tid%22%3a%22723a5a87-f39a-4a22-9247-3fc240c01396%22%2c%22Oid%22%3a%220696cfa4-1104-4b2e-b270-f382106af5a1%22%7d


Yixiang Zhang - 2021-11-24 from 3pm to 4 pm. Online

Title:Stochastic Reconstruction and Morphological Studies of Catalyst Layers of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells.

Supervisor:  Xiango Li  


Mattew Cann - 1:00 pm on December 16th (Thursday)

Title:  A Data-Driven Approach for Generating Vortex Shedding Regime Maps for an Oscillating Cylinder

Supervisors: Fue-Sang Lien, William Melek



 

Waterloo Institute for Nanotechnology Seminars