Collage of literary images related to English studies.

Below is a listing of this year's undergraduate courses. Also see our other course lists:

You can explore your English program options by visiting our Undergraduate program page and our Graduate program page.

Click on the course name for more information about the course. For information about when courses are scheduled, go to Quest (Self-Service > Class Search).

Note: Course offerings are subject to change/cancellation. For further information on course offerings, please feel free to contact Jenny Conroy.

Last updated: May 19, 2022

Fall 2022


Poetry (ENGL 100B): An introduction to poetry through a detailed examination of a range of poetic texts.

Introduction to Literary Studies (ENGL 101A): An introduction to the study of literature, covering such areas of enquiry as literary history, genre, criticism, analysis, and theory.

Introduction to Rhetorical Studies (ENGL 101B): An introduction to the study and practice of persuasion, including the history and theory of rhetoric, the structures and strategies of arguments, and the analysis of texts and artifacts.

Rhetoric in Popular Culture (ENGL 104): This course examines the role of persuasion in contemporary society by focusing on one or more topic areas: film, television, video games, comic books, music, fashion, etc. Students will explore the topic area(s) in depth using a variety of rhetorical theories and methods.

The Superhero (ENGL 108A): An examination of hero figures, ranging broadly from ancient characters such as Gilgamesh to the modern comic book superhero.

Digital Lives (ENGL 108D): An examination of how digital communication technologies create and promote online identities and social spaces, as well as interpersonal and communal interactions.

The Rebel (ENGL 108F): A study of various works of literature in which the protagonist is a rebel against existing norms. The course will examine a number of rebel types and concepts, moral implications, and final outcomes either in successful realization or in tragic defeat.

Horror (ENGL 108G): A study of the contemporary horror genre in literature and film. Topics may include the history of horror, the construction of fear, and the development of horror archetypes. Authors and creators may include H.P. Lovecraft, Shirley Jackson, George Romero, and Stephen King.

Popular Potter (ENGL 108P): This course examines all seven of J.K. Rowling's Harry Potter novels.

Tolkien: From Book to Film (ENGL 108T): A study of J.R.R. Tolkien's The Hobbit (1937) and The Lord of the Rings (1954-55), and their film adaptations by Peter Jackson (2001-03, 2012-14).

Introduction to Academic Writing (ENGL 109): An exploration of a variety of issues in academic writing such as style, argument, and the presentation of information.

Introduction to Modern Arab and Muslim Drama (ENGL 132R): The course explores contemporary Arab and Muslim drama in English (1940s-present) from multiple perspectives, including literary, social, economic, and political.

The Use of English (ENGL 140R):This course examines the uses of spoken and written English in a variety of contexts (colloquial, scientific, legal, political, commercial, journalistic, literary etc.) in order to increase critical awareness of the language and to help students write more clearly and effectively.

Shakespeare (ENGL 190): Designed for students in all faculties, the course examines some of Shakespeare's comedies, history plays, and tragedies. Shakespeare's variety and flexibility in developing characters and dramatic structures are stressed, as are significant themes.

English Literatures 1 (ENGL 200A): An introduction to the diverse forms and voices of literature written in English from the Middle Ages to the late 18th century, focussing on key writers and works, including works by women and people of colour. Students will explore literary techniques, historical and cultural contexts, and the question of the canon.

The Bible and Literature 1 (ENGL 202A): A study of the major stories, themes, and literary characteristics of the Old Testament of the King James Bible (also known as the Hebrew Scripture), and of its influence on other English literature.

Designing Digital Images and Hypertext (ENGL 203): This course draws on multiple theoretical perspectives to introduce students to the fundamental principles of multi-modal communication design in its social context. Students will analyze, design, and produce images and interactivity for use in a variety of digital platforms, including e-learning and business applications.

Forms of Fantasy (ENGL 208A): A study of fantasy literature, including some subgenres such as romances, fairy tales, fables, and gothic and horror fiction.

Travel Literature (ENGL 208M): The course examines the forms and functions of travel literature as a genre. Topics will include the representation of travel as adventure, discovery, pilgrimage, and escape; travel and tourism; travel and gender; travel and colonialism.

Genres of Creative Writing (ENGL 210C): This course introduces students to both contemporary and historical forms of creative writing.

Genres of Business Communication (ENGL 210F): This courses explores the genres of communication in business and other organizations, such as reports (of several kinds), letters, email messages, marketing materials, public relations materials, and any other types of organizational communication.

Arts Writing (ENGL 210H): A study of the various forms, processes, and modes of publication of professional writing in the arts. 

Graphic Narrative (ENGL 232): A study of graphic narrative (such as comics, graphic novels, and alternative modes) from the eighteenth century to the present. This course addresses issues such as the history and formal conventions of the medium as well as the unique rhetoric of comics-based storytelling. Topics of interest may include graphic memoir, multimodality, cross-cultural influence, and the comics-as-literature movement.

Literary Theory and Criticism (ENGL 251): What exactly are we doing when we study literature? By examining a selection of critical methods and theoretical approaches, this course will enhance understanding of the many different emphases, values, and priorities critics bring to literature, and the many available perspectives on what constitutes literature's significance.

Global Literatures (ENGL 291): How has border-crossing shaped the field of English literary studies? In this course, students will discuss works of literature from around the world that explore such themes as colonialism, migration, transnationalism, and the global.

Rhetorical Theory and Criticism (ENGL 292): The course inductively defines the fields of Rhetoric and Professional Writing through an exploration of contemporary issues in language, writing, and rhetoric, as those issues are identified and dealt with, in the pertinent scholarly and professional journals, by current researchers and their work.

Introduction to Digital Media Studies (ENGL 293): A study of theories of digital media, including critical, rhetorical, and semiotic approaches, and of the interpretation and creation of digital media artifacts.

Game Studies (ENGL 294): This course introduces students to the field of humanities-based game studies.

Social Media (ENGL 295): This course surveys the popular social media landscape and charts scholarly approaches, both methodological and theoretical, to understanding and analyzing social media texts.

Designing with Digital Sound (ENGL 304): In this course students will be introduced to sound analysis and production. Students will learn to record, edit, and implement sound in a variety of linear and non-linear media forms, with emphasis on film and video games.

Introduction to Linguistics (ENGL 306A): Introduction to linguistics and the principles of linguistic analysis through an examination of English phonology, forms, syntax, and discourse.

Introduction to Semiotics (ENGL 306F): A study of systems of signs, codes, and signification in language, culture, and literature.

Race and Resistance (ENGL 308): An examination of how contemporary literary and cultural texts represent, reconfigure, and resist ideas of race. Analyzing literature, film, art, popular culture, and social movements, this course covers major debates in critical race theory and anti-racist practices.

Rhetoric, Classical to Enlightenment (ENGL 309A): A study of rhetorical theories from antiquity through the Renaissance to the eighteenth century, with an emphasis on how these theories reflect changing attitudes towards language, society, and the self.

Contemporary Rhetoric (ENGL 309C): An examination of contemporary rhetorical theory and its relationships to criticism, interdisciplinary studies, and digital applications.

Non-Chaucerian Middle English Literature (ENGL 310C): Non-Chaucerian English writings during the later Middle Ages; the Middle English romance, including "Sir Gawain and the Green Knight"; alliterative literature, such as "Piers Plowman"; and representative examples of Middle English non-Chaucerian verse.

Austen (ENGL 325): A study of selected novels by Jane Austen, including Pride and Prejudice and Emma. 

Black Diasporic Lives: 1740-1900 (BLKST 240/ENGL 327): An introduction to cultural productions of the Black diaspora pre-1900, with an emphasis on political writing, memoir, fiction, and journalism. Students will engage works from a variety of regions, situated in their historical and cultural contexts, even as connections will be drawn to later social movements.
*Note: This course will be cross-listed as ENGL 327 starting in Fall 2023. For Fall 2022, students can enrol in BLKST 240 and the course can be counted as ENGL 327. This course can be counted towards the "Literatures Medieval to Romantic" category for Literature and Literature & Rhetoric majors, and the "Literature" category for RMPC majors.

Topics in Creative Writing (ENGL 332): This course will focus on a selected genre, approach, creative method, or other aspect of Creative Writing. Please see course instructor for details.

Creative Writing 1 (ENGL 335): Aimed at encouraging students to develop their creative and critical potentials, the course consists of supervised practice, tutorials, and seminar discussions.

Creative Writing 2 (ENGL 336): Designed to assist advanced creative writers to develop their skills in various genres by means of workshop processes, supervised practice, and critical discussion of one or more major projects.

American Literature Since 1945 (ENGL 347): A study of the movements of American Literature following the second world war. The course will consider the formal and cultural diversity of writing in this period, with attention to topics such as avant-garde experiment, the persistence of realism, counter-cultural politics, feminism and literature, postmodernism, and the emergence of minority writers in the mainstream.

Shakespeare 2 (ENGL 363): A study of the plays written after 1599-1600, including Julius Caesar.

Professional Communications in Statistics and Actuarial Science (ENGL 378): This course introduces students to oral and written communication in the fields of Statistics and Actuarial Science.

Visual Rhetoric (ENGL 392B): This course introduces students to the study of images from a rhetorical perspective, including the interaction of texts and images in such professional writing fields as advertising, book illustration, technical documentation, journalism, and public relations.

Literature of the Romantic Period 2 (ENGL 430B): An examination of the second generation of Romantic writers, including such authors as Byron, P. B. Shelley, Mary Shelley, Keats, and Hemans.

Adapting Literary Works (ENGL 471): Focusing on modern and contemporary adaptation of works of literature in English, this course examines the problems, possibilities, and principles of representing such works in other literary forms and in other media.

Topics in Literatures Romantic to Modern (ENGL 485): A special study of a selected topic, author, genre, or period in Romantic to Modern literatures.

Winter 2023


Fiction (ENGL 100A): An introduction to fiction through the detailed examination of a range of novels and/or short stories. 

Introduction to Literary Studies (ENGL 101A): An introduction to the study of literature, covering such areas of enquiry as literary history, genre, criticism, analysis, and theory.

Introduction to Rhetorical Studies (ENGL 101B): An introduction to the study and practice of persuasion, including the history and theory of rhetoric, the structures and strategies of arguments, and the analysis of texts and artifacts.

The Superhero (ENGL 108A): An examination of hero figures, ranging broadly from ancient characters such as Gilgamesh to the modern comic book superhero.

Global English Literatures (ENGL 108B): An exploration of texts from a range of geographical locations, such as South Africa, Australia, the Caribbean, India, New Zealand, and Pakistan.

Digital Lives (ENGL 108D): An examination of how digital communication technologies create and promote online identities and social spaces, as well as interpersonal and communal interactions.

Popular Potter (ENGL 108P): This course examines all seven of J.K. Rowling's Harry Potter novels.

Literature and Medicine (ENGL 108X): How can literature help us understand the body, illness, and healing? The course considers the perspectives of patients and medical practitioners across a range of works, including poetry, fiction, medical texts, and other nonfiction.

Introduction to Academic Writing (ENGL 109): An exploration of a variety of issues in academic writing such as style, argument, and the presentation of information.

Communications in Mathematics & Computer Science (ENGL 119): This course builds students' oral and written communication skills to prepare them for academic and workplace demands.

The Use of English (ENGL 140R):This course examines the uses of spoken and written English in a variety of contexts (colloquial, scientific, legal, political, commercial, journalistic, literary etc.) in order to increase critical awareness of the language and to help students write more clearly and effectively.

English Literatures 1 (ENGL 200A): An introduction to the diverse forms and voices of literature written in English from the Middle Ages to the late 18th century, focussing on key writers and works, including works by women and people of colour. Students will explore literary techniques, historical and cultural contexts, and the question of the canon.
 

English Literatures 2 (ENGL 200B): An introduction to the diverse forms and voices of literature written in English from the late 18th century to the present, focussing on key writers and works from Britain and North America, and including works by women and people of colour. Students will explore literary techniques, historical and cultural contexts, and the question of the canon.

English Literatures 3 (ENGL 200C): An introduction to literature written by people of colour and Indigenous and Black authors. Using a postcolonial and anti-racist framework, this course examines historical and contemporary issues of race, racism, and colonialism in a variety of literary texts.

The Short Story (ENGL 201): This course deals with the history and techniques of the short story, with emphasis upon works by such British, American, and Canadian writers as Henry James, James Joyce, D.H. Lawrence, Ernest Hemingway, and Alice Munro.

Writing Lives (ENGL 206): This course studies the ways the self is constructed through text by examining a variety of life-writing approaches, organized from youth to old age, along with theories of identity, memory, gender, narrative, cultural studies, and autobiography as a genre.

Science Fiction (ENGL 208B): Various examples drawn, for instance, from Utopian and anti-Utopian science fiction, social science fiction, "gadget" science fiction, parapsychology, and alternate worlds and beings will be considered.

Studies in Children's Literature (ENGL 208C): A critical examination of works of children's literature. Specific readings may range broadly, encompassing works as diverse as ancient folk tales and novels and poetry from the 18th century to the present day.

Women's Writing (ENGL 208E): This course explores a range of women's writing and the social and cultural contexts in which they made their voices heard.

Genres of Creative Writing (ENGL 210C): This course introduces students to both contemporary and historical forms of creative writing.

Genres of Technical Communication (ENGL 210E): This course explores writing, presentation, and design across various genres of technical communication, with a primary focus on printed and/or online computer documentation.

Genres of Business Communication (ENGL 210F): This courses explores the genres of communication in business and other organizations, such as reports (of several kinds), letters, email messages, marketing materials, public relations materials, and any other types of organizational communication.

Legal Writing (ENGL 210I): A study of the principles, processes, and various forms of writing used in the practice of law and drafting of legislation.

Literature, Rhetoric, and the Visual Arts (ENGL 242): This course will study literature and rhetoric in dialogue with the visual arts, including potential materials such as paintings, photography, illustrations, sculpture, monuments and memorials, installation art, multimedia and digital media. Course material will draw on a variety of literary and rhetorical genres, historical periods, and forms of visual art.

Literary Theory and Criticism (ENGL 251): What exactly are we doing when we study literature? By examining a selection of critical methods and theoretical approaches, this course will enhance understanding of the many different emphases, values, and priorities critics bring to literature, and the many available perspectives on what constitutes literature's significance.

Rhetorical Theory and Criticism (ENGL 292): The course inductively defines the fields of Rhetoric and Professional Writing through an exploration of contemporary issues in language, writing, and rhetoric, as those issues are identified and dealt with, in the pertinent scholarly and professional journals, by current researchers and their work.

Introduction to Digital Media Studies (ENGL 293): A study of theories of digital media, including critical, rhetorical, and semiotic approaches, and of the interpretation and creation of digital media artifacts.

Social Media (ENGL 295): This course surveys the popular social media landscape and charts scholarly approaches, both methodological and theoretical, to understanding and analyzing social media texts.

Introduction to Linguistics (ENGL 306A): Introduction to linguistics and the principles of linguistic analysis through an examination of English phonology, forms, syntax, and discourse.

Rhetoric, Classical to Enlightenment (ENGL 309A): A study of rhetorical theories from antiquity through the Renaissance to the eighteenth century, with an emphasis on how these theories reflect changing attitudes towards language, society, and the self.

Contemporary Rhetoric (ENGL 309C): An examination of contemporary rhetorical theory and its relationships to criticism, interdisciplinary studies, and digital applications.

The Discourse of Dissent (ENGL 309G): A study of the social, historical, and rhetorical dimensions of collective action. Topics may include health and welfare movements, civil rights and anti-war protests, and environmentalism.

Modern Canadian Literature (ENGL 315): This course focuses on the varied ways in which 20th-century writers of poetry and prose participate in the shaping of Canadian literary culture, with emphasis on the literature of the middle decades. Also offered online.

History and Theory of Media 2 (ENGL 320): This course explores the social, political, and cultural contexts and consequences of contemporary technologies of representation such as print and visual media, photography and film, audio recordings, computer-mediated communications, and interactive digital media.

Language, Life, and Literature in the Caribbean (BLKST 210/ENGL 326): This course introduces students to the ways in which language shapes and sustains various forms of cultural expressions in the Caribbean region. Students will use the creative output of storytellers, poets, DJs, and playwrights as a lens to investigate and trace the evolution of a distinctly Caribbean identity from the post-colonial period (1960s) up to the present. Students are also introduced to the social dynamics of Creole language use in the Caribbean and an exploration of the ways in which these languages are implicated in diverse cultural art forms.
*Note: This course will be cross-listed as ENGL 326 starting in Fall 2023. For Winter 2023, students can enrol in BLKST 210 and the course can be counted as ENGL 326. This course can be counted towards the "Literatures Modern to Contemporary" category for Literature and Literature & Rhetoric majors, and the "Literature" category for RMPC majors.

Topics in Creative Writing (ENGL 332): This course will focus on a selected genre, approach, creative method, or other aspect of Creative Writing. Please see course instructor for details.

Creative Writing 1 (ENGL 335): Aimed at encouraging students to develop their creative and critical potentials, the course consists of supervised practice, tutorials, and seminar discussions.

Creative Writing 2 (ENGL 336): Designed to assist advanced creative writers to develop their skills in various genres by means of workshop processes, supervised practice, and critical discussion of one or more major projects.

Modern American Literature (ENGL 344): A study of American Literature from the early twentieth century through the second world war, emphasizing aesthetic innovation in the modernist movement, and its aftermath in the social writings of the 1930s.

American Literature in a Global Context (ENGL 345): A study of the ways in which movements of peoples and cultures have shaped American literature. Topics may include colonialism, immigration and migration, literary influence across borders and languages, nativism and internationalism, racial and ethnic styles and exchanges. Also offered online.

Shakespeare 1 (ENGL 362): A study of the plays written before 1599-1600, excluding Julius Caesar. Also offered online.

Professional Communications in Statistics and Actuarial Science (ENGL 378): This course introduces students to oral and written communication in the fields of Statistics and Actuarial Science.

The Discourse of Advertising (ENGL 408B): This course introduces students to writing and editing advertising copy. Students will also be introduced to models of discourse and rhetorical analysis of advertising texts. Assignments include creating a portfolio of advertising copy and an extensive analysis of sample advertising discourse.

Eighteenth-Century Literature and Media (ENGL 412): A study of oral, printed, and popular media and literature (such as ballads, fiction, and newspapers) in the Restoration and 18th century. Topics may include the role of women in the rise of print culture, the social role of popular print forms, and the literary reception of new media technologies.

Topics in the History and Theory of Rhetoric (ENGL 492): A special study of a selected topic in the history and theory of rhetoric. 

Topics in Forms of Media and Critical Analysis (ENGL 494): A special study of a selected topic in forms of media and critical analysis. 

Spring 2023


Introduction to Rhetorical Studies (ENGL 101B): An introduction to the study and practice of persuasion, including the history and theory of rhetoric, the structures and strategies of arguments, and the analysis of texts and artifacts.

The Superhero (ENGL 108A): An examination of hero figures, ranging broadly from ancient characters such as Gilgamesh to the modern comic book superhero.

Digital Lives (ENGL 108D): An examination of how digital communication technologies create and promote online identities and social spaces, as well as interpersonal and communal interactions.

Popular Potter (ENGL 108P): This course examines all seven of J.K. Rowling's Harry Potter novels.

Introduction to Academic Writing (ENGL 109): An exploration of a variety of issues in academic writing such as style, argument, and the presentation of information.

Communications in Mathematics & Computer Science (ENGL 119): This course builds students' oral and written communication skills to prepare them for academic and workplace demands.

The Use of English (ENGL 140R):This course examines the uses of spoken and written English in a variety of contexts (colloquial, scientific, legal, political, commercial, journalistic, literary etc.) in order to increase critical awareness of the language and to help students write more clearly and effectively.

English Literatures 2 (ENGL 200B): An introduction to the diverse forms and voices of literature written in English from the late 18th century to the present, focussing on key writers and works from Britain and North America, and including works by women and people of colour. Students will explore literary techniques, historical and cultural contexts, and the question of the canon.

Forms of Fantasy (ENGL 208A): A study of fantasy literature, including some subgenres such as romances, fairy tales, fables, and gothic and horror fiction.

Genres of Creative Writing (ENGL 210C): This course introduces students to both contemporary and historical forms of creative writing.

Genres of Business Communication (ENGL 210F): This courses explores the genres of communication in business and other organizations, such as reports (of several kinds), letters, email messages, marketing materials, public relations materials, and any other types of organizational communication.

Technical Editing (ENGL 210J): This course will introduce students to practices and tools of technical editing, such as language and format editing, verification and fact-checking, style guide consistency, discourse appropriateness, and the use of profession-specific software.

Introduction to Anti-Racist Communication (BLKST 203/ENGL 225): This course surveys the rhetorical strategies of both more recent and historical civil rights and anti-racist activists. Students will use Black rhetorical theory and will examine work by international historical figures such as Franz Fanon, Aime Cesaire, Eduord Glissant, Albert Memmi, and Mohanda Gandhi, Frederick Douglas, WEB Dubois, Martin Luther King, Fannie Lou Hamer, Malcolm X, Angela Davis, Stokely Carmichael, Fred Hampton, Robert Hill, and Walter Rodney and such recent figures as Kimberle Crenshaw, Robyn Maynard, Brittney Cooper, Desmond Cole, Feminista Jones, Rinaldo Walcott, and Idil Abdillahi. The objective for students is to understand the evolution of liberatory, anti-racist rhetoric and the rhetorical successes and failures of key anti-racist activists.
*Note: This course will be cross-listed as ENGL 225 starting in Fall 2023. For Spring 2023, students can enrol in BLKST 203 and the course can be counted as ENGL 225. This course can be counted towards the "Professional Writing, Communication Design; Forms of Media and Critical Analysis; History and Theory of Language" category for Literature & Rhetoric majors, and the "Forms of Media and Critical Analysis; History and Theory of Language" category for RMPC majors, or as a 200-level ENGL elective for all ENGL plans.

The Pleasure of Poetry (ENGL 230): This course is an introduction to the enjoyment of poetry: what we like about it, what makes it fun, and how we can enjoy it more. Students will have an opportunity to expand their understanding of poetry. A range of poems will be sampled, and students will have opportunities to share poems that they like.

Literary Theory and Criticism (ENGL 251): What exactly are we doing when we study literature? By examining a selection of critical methods and theoretical approaches, this course will enhance understanding of the many different emphases, values, and priorities critics bring to literature, and the many available perspectives on what constitutes literature's significance.

Fiction and Film (ENGL 275): A study of the relationships between written and cinematic narrative focussing on adaptations of fiction to film and the different narrative techniques of each medium.

Rhetorical Theory and Criticism (ENGL 292): The course inductively defines the fields of Rhetoric and Professional Writing through an exploration of contemporary issues in language, writing, and rhetoric, as those issues are identified and dealt with, in the pertinent scholarly and professional journals, by current researchers and their work.

Game Studies (ENGL 294): This course introduces students to the field of humanities-based game studies.

Social Media (ENGL 295): This course surveys the popular social media landscape and charts scholarly approaches, both methodological and theoretical, to understanding and analyzing social media texts.

Introduction to Linguistics (ENGL 306A): Introduction to linguistics and the principles of linguistic analysis through an examination of English phonology, forms, syntax, and discourse.

Contemporary Rhetoric (ENGL 309C): An examination of contemporary rhetorical theory and its relationships to criticism, interdisciplinary studies, and digital applications.

History and Theory of Writing and Print Media (ENGL 319): This course explores the social, political, and cultural contexts and consequences of the media technologies of writing and print (including the book) from their beginnings to the 20th century.

Postcolonial Literature of the Americas (ENGL 322): This course examines postcolonial literature in English from Canada, the U.S., and the Caribbean. Through study of both written and oral genres, we will discuss how language practices adapt to and are created in colonial and postcolonial contexts. Topics may include diaspora and migration, nationalism, gender, neo-colonialism, and multiculturalism.

Creative Writing 1 (ENGL 335): Aimed at encouraging students to develop their creative and critical potentials, the course consists of supervised practice, tutorials, and seminar discussions.

Seventeenth-Century Literature 2  (ENGL 350B): An intensive study of Milton's epic, Paradise Lost, in its historical and literary contexts. Also offered online.

Shakespeare 1 (ENGL 362): A study of the plays written before 1599-1600, excluding Julius Caesar. Also offered online.

Shakespeare in Performance at The Stratford Festival (ENGL 364): An historical, theoretical, and analytical introduction to Shakespeare's plays in performance, both on stage and screen, this course focuses on specific problems and decisive issues of past productions and of those in the current Stratford Festival season.

Voice and Text at the Stratford Festival (ENGL 367): Taught by faculty and Stratford Festival coaches, this practical course invites students to explore acting techniques and exercises to develop their stage voice with a particular focus on Shakespeare's plays. This is a block course that meets in Stratford for two weeks in May, and may be taken with ENGL 364, as the two courses are offered at complementary times. The course is offered as part of a consortium with faculty from five universities. Students are required to arrange their own transportation to Stratford.

Writing Anti-Racism (BLKST 308/ENGL 373): 

In this course students will be introduced to counterstory as research method, genre, and organizing rhetoric within anti-racist movements. Students will examine counterstory in the context of Critical Race Theory and read classic counterstories by figures such as Derrick Bell, Patricia Williams, Richard Delgado, Bryan Brayboy, Tomson Highway, and Lee Maracle. Course activities will challenge students to assess and assert the value and truth of the Black lived experience, Black epistemologies, and Black knowledge production, including that of Black Canadians and their Indigenous and Allies of Colour. Students will write, workshop, revise, and publish their own actionable anti-racist commitments.
*Note: This course will be cross-listed as ENGL 373 starting in Fall 2023. For Spring 2023, students can enrol in BLKST 308 and the course can be counted as ENGL 373. This course can be counted towards the "Professional Writing, Communication Design; Forms of Media and Critical Analysis; History and Theory of Language" category for Literature & Rhetoric majors, and the "Forms of Media and Critical Analysis; History and Theory of Language" category for RMPC majors, or as a 300-level ENGL elective for all ENGL plans.

Professional Communications in Statistics and Actuarial Science (ENGL 378): This course introduces students to oral and written communication in the fields of Statistics and Actuarial Science.

Information Design (ENGL 392A): The theory and practice of design for print and digital media, including the study of design concepts such as space, colour, typography, interactivity, immersion, motion, and presence.

Topics in Forms of Media and Critical Analysis (ENGL 494): A special study of a selected topic in forms of media and critical analysis.