Assistant Professor

janicebarryheadshotDegrees

PhD, Community and Regional Planning, University of British Columbia, Canada, 2011

MA, Canadian Studies & Native Studies, Trent University, Canada, 2004

BSc, Environmental Science & Biology, Trent University, Canada, 2000

Contact information

janice.barry@uwaterloo.ca
519-888-4567 ext. 31547
Office Location: EV3 3312

Research interests

  • Politics of community engagement & collaborative approaches to planning
  • Planning policies, institutions and governance
  • Planning theory
  • Settler colonialism, Indigenous/non-Indigenous relations and contemporary planning practice
  • Decolonization of planning practice and planning education
  • Interpretative and critical policy analysis
  • Qualitative research (case studies, interview-based methods, and discourse analysis)
  • Community-engaged teaching and research

Research grants/projects

  • Co-Investigator. Whose Metrics? Creating community-based indicators to reimagine First Nations housing systems. SSHRC Partnership Development Grant. 
    • Grant Period: 2018-2021. 
    • PI: Shelagh McCartney, Ryerson University
  • Principal Investigator. Indigenous Peoples, Municipalities and the Emergence of New Urban Planning Contact Zones: The Examples of Manitoba, Canada & Canterbury, Aotearoa New Zealand. SSHRC Insight Development.
    • Grant Period: 2016-2018
    • CI: Michelle Thompson-Fawcett, University of Otago, New Zealand
    • Collaborator: Hirini Matunga, Lincoln University, New Zealand.

Contact Janice Barry for more information on research opportunities.

Graduate student supervision

 

Number of students currently supervising/co-supervising

Total number of student supervisions/co-supervisions

Masters

1

19

PhD

1

1

Recent/ Key publications

Books

  • Porter, L. & J. Barry. (2016). Planning for Coexistence? Recognizing Indigenous rights through land-use planning in Canada and Australia. Abingdon, UK: Routledge.
  • Papers in refereed journals
  • Porter, L. & J. Barry.  (2015). Bounded Recognition: Urban Planning and the Textual Recognition of Indigenous Rights in Canada and Australia. Critical Policy Studies, 9: 22-40.
  • Saarikoski, H., K. Raitio & J. Barry. (2013). Understanding ‘Successful’ Conflict Resolution: Policy Regime Changes and New Interactive Arena in the Great Bear Rainforest. Land Use Policy, 32: 271-280.
  • Barry, J. (2012) Indigenous-State Planning as Inter-Institutional Capacity Development: The Evolution of ‘Government-to-Government’ Relations in Coastal British Columbia, Canada. Planning Theory & Practice 1: 213-231.
  • Barry, J. & L. Porter. (2012) Indigenous Recognition in State-Based Planning Systems: Understanding Textual Mediation in the Contact Zone. Planning Theory 11: 170-187
  • Barry, J. (2011). Mobilized Bias and Multi-Stakeholder Protected Area Planning in Ontario, Canada: A Socio-Institutional Perspective on Collaboration. Journal of Society and Natural Resources 24: 1116-1126.

Book Chapters

  • Barry J. (2016). Not stakeholders in these parts: Indigenous peoples and urban planning. In: Y. Beebeejaun (Ed), The Participatory City (pp. 23-29). Berlin: Jovis.
  • Barry, J. (2016). Government-to-Government Planning and the Recognition of Indigenous Rights and Title in the Central Coast Land and Resource Management Plan. In: R. Thomas (Ed), Planning Canada: A Case Study Approach. Oxford University Press Canada.
  • Barry, J. (2015). From British City Centre to British Columbia’s Central Coast: The Transferability of the Institutional Capacity Development Framework. In: J. Hillier & J. Metzger (Eds), Connections: A Festschrift for Patsy Healey. Surrey (pp. 313-327), UK: Ashgate.

Papers in Refereed Journals

  • Barry, J., E. Allen, D. Chandran, J. Cook, B. Curtis, A. Kostyniuk, P. Mikulec, M. Seale & D. Yau. (2019) Unsettling Notions of Planning Competence: Lessons from Studio-Based Learning with Indigenous Peoples. Journal of Planning Education and Research. https://doi.org/10.1177/0739456X19844571
  • Thompson-Fawcett, M., A. Kitson & J. Barry. (2018)  Enhancing cultural aspirations in urban design: The gradual transformation by Indigenous innovation. Urban Design International. https://doi.org/10.1057/s41289-018-0075-y
  • Barry, J., M. Horst, A. Inch, C. Legacy, S. Rishi, J.J. Rivero, A. Taufen, J.M. Zanotto & A. Zitcer. (2018) Unsettling Planning Theory. Planning Theory 17: 418-438.
  • Barry, J. (2015) Unsettling Planning Education through Community-Engaged Teaching and Learning: Reflections on the Indigenous Planning Studio. Planning Theory & Practice, 16(3), pp. 430-434.
  • Porter, L. & J. Barry. (2015). Bounded Recognition: Urban Planning and the Textual Recognition of Indigenous Rights in Canada and Australia. Critical Policy Studies, 9: 22-40.
  • Saarikoski, H., K. Raitio & J. Barry. (2013). Understanding ‘Successful’ Conflict Resolution: Policy Regime Changes and New Interactive Arena in the Great Bear Rainforest. Land Use Policy, 32: 271-280.
  • Barry, J. (2012). Indigenous-State Planning as Inter-Institutional Capacity Development: The Evolution of ‘Government-to-Government’ Relations in Coastal British Columbia, Canada. Planning Theory & Practice 1: 213-231.
  • Barry, J. & L. Porter. (2012). Indigenous Recognition in State-Based Planning Systems: Understanding Textual Mediation in the Contact Zone. Planning Theory 11: 170-187.
  • Barry, J. (2011). Mobilized Bias and Multi-Stakeholder Protected Area Planning in Ontario, Canada: A Socio-Institutional Perspective on Collaboration. Journal of Society and Natural Resources 24: 1116-1126.

Courses Taught

Plan 474/674: Special Topics – Indigenous Peoples and Community Planning
Plan 346: Advanced Planning Tools: Public Participation, Negotiation and Mediation
Plan 702: Critical Assessment of Theories, Methods, and Practices of Planning

Affiliation: 
University of Waterloo

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