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PhD Student Seminars

PhD Student Seminars

Goals

PhD Students in the Department of Economics at University of Waterloo organize a bi-weekly seminar in each semester. The goals of the seminar are to provide graduate students opportunities to develop presentation skills and to provide a friendly academic environment in which PhD students can present their research advancements and benefit from criticism. The seminar is a great opportunity to improve presentation skills, to receive feedback from colleagues and professors, to strengthen the PhD community, and to share our academic worries and questions in a constructive and friendly meeting.

Presenters

Following the successful passage of the Comprehensive Examinations, students will present in the Economics PhD student seminar starting in their second year and continuing until the semester of their thesis defense.

PhD students from other departments and universities are welcome to present if their topics are related to Economics. Master students and other academics are also welcome to contribute to the seminar.

The presentation will be 30-45 minute, followed by question time. The time and location will be announced in the beginning of every semester. The bi-weekly presentations will be scheduled as regularly as possible and repeated on a more or less regular basis.


Time and Location

Winter 2019

The PhD student seminars are held on Tuesdays at 1:00-2:00, in HH 235.
 

Date Time Location Presenter Title

February 5, 2019

1:00-2:00pm

HH 227

  

Andrés Arcila Vasquez

The Distributional Effects of the Affordable Childcare Policy

February 26, 2019

1:00-2:00 HH 227

John Baker

Quantifying Real Time Sentiment to Monetary Policy Decisions
March 12, 2019 1:00-2:00 HH 227 Zehua Pan

The effect of forest land use on the cost of drinking water supply: A spatial econometric analysis

Jens Abildtrup, Serge Garcia, and Anne Stenger

March 26, 2019

 1:00-2:00 HH 227 Renfang Tian TBA

April 9, 2019

 1:00-2:00

  

HH 227

 

Annie Pan

House Price Changes and Female Labour Supply: Evidence from Canada