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The Waterloo Laurier Labour (WALL) Seminar

What is The WALL?

The WALL (WAterloo Laurier Labour) seminar workshop is a group of faculty members and PhD students who are interested in labour economics. Originally conceived as a reading group, this term it will resemble more a place to bounce ideas and get feedback for initial research work.

You will find on this page information regarding schedule and articles. Everyone is welcome. If you have questions or requests, contact Ana Ferrer (UW) or Tammy Schirle (WLU).

The WALL Schedule (Winter 2017)

Meets on Fridays in room HH235 from 10:00 to 11:30 on alternate weeks, starting on January 27

Date Speaker

Paper

January 27

Yazhuo Pan (Annie)

“Household Bargaining and Female Labour Supply”

February 10 Thomas Parker TBD
March 3 Chris Riddell “Inside the black box of firm provided training: Evidence from the performance management records of four firms”
March 17 Andres Arcila Vasquez “Constructing a Job quality index”
March 31 Mikal Skuterud “The Relative Labour Market Performance of Former International Students
April 14 Pierre Chausse TBD

The WALL Schedule (Fall 2016)

Meets on Wednesdays in HH 235 from 11:30am to 12:30pm on alternate weeks, starting on September 21st, 2016. 

See you there!

Date Speaker Paper
September 21 Bilal Khan

“Export Destination, Skill Utilization and Skill Premium in Chinese Manufacturing sector”

October 5 Mikal Skuterud

“Immigrant Selection, Skills, and Labour Market Performance: An Evaluation of Immigration Policy in Australia, Canada and the U.S. ”, (with A.Clarke and A.Ferrer).

October 19 Yehui Lao TBA
November 2 Chris Riddell “Inside the black box of firm provided training: Evidence from the performance management records of four firms”
November 16 Yazhuo Pan (Annie) “Changes in Family Structure and Child Cognitive Outcomes: Evidence from Canadian Longitudinal Data of Children” (Second year paper presentation )
November 30

Andres Arcila/Thomas Parker

OR

Stephanie Lluis/Annie

TBA

"Employment Insurance Changes and Labour Market Transitions: Evidence from the Canadian LFS 2003-2009"