Tuesday, January 7, 2020

Professor Kirsten Morris named 2020 Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Fellow

Professor Kirsten Morris has been named an Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Fellow. She is being recognized for contributions to control and estimator design for infinite-dimensional systems. 

Tuesday, December 3, 2019

New math model could lead to more personalized cancer therapies

Magnifying glass over the word cancer in a newspaper

Researchers have found a new way to use math to better treat cancer and prevent its relapse.

Using the first mathematical model of its kind, researchers at the University of Waterloo found a way to study the interactions between the immune system and different types of cancer cells.

Using their new model, the researchers found that administering different cancer therapies in a particular sequence could better target cancer stem cells in tumours, potentially leading to more personalized treatments for cancer patients. 

Thursday, November 28, 2019

Professor Kirsten Morris elevated to IEEE Fellow

 
The Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) has elevated Applied Mathematics Professor Kirsten Morris to the grade of Fellow, effective January 2020. This honour, bestowed “for contributions to control and estimator design for infinite-dimensional systems”, places Professor Morris at the highest grade of membership in the IEEE in recognition of extraordinary achievements and experience.
Tuesday, November 26, 2019

Researchers reach milestone in quantum standardization

Mike and Ophelia Lazaridis Quantum-Nano Centre

Researchers at the University of Waterloo have developed a method that could pave the way to establishing universal standards for measuring the performance of quantum computers.

Wednesday, October 30, 2019

Fall Convocation: 25 October 2019

graduate students holding diplomas at convocation

15 graduate degrees in Applied Mathematics were awarded at the Fall 2019 convocation.  

 

Thursday, October 24, 2019

Medication proves more effective when prescribed based on gender

Anita Layton writing equations on a clear surface

The drugs your doctor prescribes to treat your high blood pressure could be more effective if they were best suited for your gender. 

In a study using the world’s first computational female kidney model, developed by researchers at the University of Waterloo, high blood pressure medication was shown to be more effective when gender was taken into consideration.

Thursday, October 17, 2019

Mathematical modelling vital to tackling disease outbreaks

Doctor bent over a patient in a hospital bed

Predicting and controlling disease outbreaks would be easier and more reliable with the wider application of mathematical modelling, according to a new study. 

The study was conducted by researchers at the University of Waterloo, University of Maryland and Yale’s School of Public Health. 

Monday, October 7, 2019

Computer kidney sheds light on proper hydration

Computer kidney computer display

A new computer kidney developed at the University of Waterloo could tell researchers more about the impacts of medicines taken by people who don’t drink enough water. 

In a recent study, Waterloo researchers found that the elderly, people with impaired kidney function and those taking a combination of certain drugs need to be extra mindful of their water intake.

Friday, September 6, 2019

Applied Mathematics Professor awarded CFI funding

Anita Layton
 

Anita Layton (Professor of Applied Mathematics, Pharmacy, and Biology) received $100,000 in funding through the Canada Foundation for Innovation (CFI) John R. Evans Leaders Fund (JELF). The award will fund infrastructure needed to support Layton's Canada 150 Research Chair research program, and to establish the Virtual Physiological Human Laboratory.

Friday, September 6, 2019

Award-winning combination: Math + Medicine

Colin Phipps, AbbVie. Top 40 under 40 Chicago Scientists

Colin Phipps (PhD ’14) always loved math and computer science, but he always wanted to apply those skills to a high impact field.