Applied mathematics researchers study unique hydrology of Yucatan Peninsula, informing present-day climate science

Wednesday, August 18, 2021

Yucatan limestone formations

Researchers in applied mathematics have made new discoveries on the hydrology of the Yucatan Peninsula. The research has implications for historical understandings of the Maya civilization, the archaeology of the Yucatan and for present-day climate science as well.

The research project is the combined work of Aaron Coutino, a recent PhD graduate in applied mathematics, and Marek Stastna, a professor of applied mathematics and Coutino’s PhD supervisor. Coutino spent significant time in the Yucatan conducting research on the hydrology of the region, working with local divers to install and monitor sensors in lakes and underground caves to gather data on the water table.

A new paper, “Inland tidal oscillations within the Yucatan Peninsula,” authored by Coutino, Stastna, and their co-authors Chelsi McNeill-Jewer and Eduard Reinhardt, was recently published in the journal Geophysical Research Letters.

Read more on the findings of this research project in the article on the Math News site at this link.

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