Master of Climate Change Program Handbook

Introduction

Welcome to the Master of Climate Change program!

The Master of Climate Change (MCC) program is a specialized, course-based, non-thesis program. It is normally completed over a period of three terms (12 months) of full-time studies at the main campus of the University of Waterloo. A part-time studies option is also available. The part-time option is normally completed in six to eight terms of part-time studies.

The Master of Climate Change (MCC) program handbook includes important background information about the Department, Faculty, and University policies and services that are available to you. The handbook is intended to be your first stop for the answers to questions that you might have. Please take some time to review it, as we expect you to be familiar with its contents as you proceed through your program of study. Please note that the handbook is only a starting point. It does not replace the University of Waterloo Graduate Academic Calendar or the other formal policies of the University concerning registration, fees, grading, degree requirements, or student rights and responsibilities.

Faculty and Department Organization

The Department of Geography and Environmental Management (GEM) is one of five academic units within the Faculty of Environment, which is one of six faculties at the University of Waterloo.

Dr. Bruce Frayne is the Dean of the Faculty of Environment, Dr. Peter Deadman is the Associate Dean for Graduate Studies, and Dr. Chris Fletcher is the Chair of the Department of Geography and Environmental Management.

Dr. Daniel Scott is the Associate Chair, Graduate Studies and the Master of Climate Change (MCC) Program Director, and Teresa Wilson is the MCC Graduate Program Coordinator.

There are a number of faculty members affiliated with the MCC that represent each of the five academic units in the Faculty of Environment:

  • Department of Knowledge Integration – offices in EV1;
  • School of Environment and Resource Studies – offices in EV2;
  • Department Geography & Environmental Management – offices in EV1;
  • School of Environment, Enterprise and Development – offices in EV3;
  • School of Planning – offices in EV3.

GEM is one of the leading Geography Departments in Canada with a strong commitment to the discovery, dissemination, and application of geographic knowledge focused on the complex interactions within and between the human and natural environments. The Department embraces a three-fold mission of excellence in research, excellence in research-led teaching in all undergraduate and graduate degree programs, and celebration of, and respect for all, members of the Department, Faculty, and University.

The Faculty of Environment, and other Faculties at the University of Waterloo, have developed a significant concentration of faculty members with diverse climate change research programs that cover the three Working Groups of the United Nations (UN) Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) - climate change science; vulnerability, impacts and adaptation; and mitigation (greenhouse gas emission reduction and carbon sequestration).

The interdisciplinary MCC program will provide students access to experts in the scientific, social, political, policy, legal, economic and ethical dimensions of climate change, including: paleoclimate, contemporary climate variability and trends, global climate services, climate prediction and modeling, the impact of climate variability and extremes on society and human welfare, climate change links to hazards/disasters, international and local ecosystems and economic development (including sectoral and geographic vulnerability assessment), climate change policy and governance (international, regional, national scales), the role of climate science in policy development, GHG emissions trajectories and scenario development, mitigation pathways and energy policy, GHG accounting and management, carbon markets and trade, adaptation strategies and processes, trade-offs and synergies between mitigation and adaptation, the economics of climate change mitigation and adaptation, climate compatible development, climate change law, and climate change ethics (including varied regional perspectives). 

Name Title and Contact Information

Chris Fletcher

Chair

EV1-327
519-888-4567, ext. 46855
chris.fletcher@uwaterloo.ca

Susie Castela

Administrative Manager

EV1-318
519-888-4567, ext. 43406
scastela@uwaterloo.ca

Kosi Ike-Orji

Financial and Administrative Coordinator

EV1-322
519-888-4567, ext. 41954
kosisochukwu.ike-orji@uwaterloo.ca

Maria Strack

Associate Chair, Graduate Studies

EV1-320
519-888-4567, ext. 40580
mstrack@uwaterloo.ca

Alan Anthony

Graduate Program Coordinator and Advisor

EV1-304
519-888-4567, ext. 42730
aanthony@uwaterloo.ca

Daniel Scott

Associate Chair, Graduate Studies and MCC Program Director

EV1-328
519-888-4567, ext. 45497
daniel.scott@uwaterloo.ca

Teresa Wilson

MCC Graduate Program Coordinator and Advisor

EV1-315
519-888-4567, ext. 48539
t24wilson@uwaterloo.ca

Erin O’Connell

Associate Chair, Undergraduate Studies (GEM, Geomatics, and CEC programs)

EV1-331
519-888-4567, ext. 47647
erin.oconnell@uwaterloo.ca

Crystal Vong

Advisor, Undergraduate Studies (GEM, Geomatics, and CEC programs)

EV1-316
519-888-4567, ext. 40977
gem-ug@uwaterloo.ca

Brandon Rodenhurst

Aviation Programs Manager
EV1-310
519-888-4567, ext. 41299
brodenhurst@uwaterloo.ca

Sophie Dallaire

Advisor, Undergraduate Studies (Geography & Aviation, and China 2+2 programs)

EV1-311
519-888-4567, ext. 41186
gem-ug@uwaterloo.ca

GEM Faculty Members by Research Area:

Climate Change and Environment

Economy and Society

Earth Systems Science

Geomatics

Important Websites

Email Accounts and Online Learning Computer Requirements

Email Accounts

Graduate student email accounts are created automatically when a student is matriculated (made active) as part of the admission process. All email addresses take the form username@uwaterloo.ca.

As a graduate student, you access your graduate uwaterloo.ca email account by using the ‘Office 365’ icon.

Log in using your WatIAM user ID and password.

It is important to check your graduate uwaterloo.ca email regularly. The program and the University of Waterloo will be communicating with you through this email account.

Please refer to Statement on official student email address webpage for additional information on your email account

If you require technical assistance, please contact Environment Computing.

Online Learning Computer Requirements

Waterloo LEARN courses are designed to function in a variety of operating systems and web browsers. While courses generally function well in many computer configurations, only some are formally supported and tested. Please see System and Software Requirements for the latest computer requirements.

Fees and Registration

Quest

You have already used Quest for various purposes, such as to upload your application documents, check your application status, and review your offer of admission. You will also use Quest to enroll in courses, obtain your fee statement, view your financial aid, change your personal information, view your unofficial transcript for grades, and view your course schedule. Be sure to familiarize yourself with this system. More information regarding Quest can be found on the Quest website.

Tuition Fee Information

Hard copy fee bills are not mailed to you from Finance. Your fee statement is available on Quest.

Payment Procedures

Information on making fee payments and becoming 'fees arranged' is provided on the Finance website.

Enrollment Regulations

Familiarize yourself with the regulations in the current graduate studies academic calendar.

By registering and paying fees, students assume responsibility for knowing the regulations and pertinent procedures as set forth in this handbook and the University of Waterloo Graduate Studies Academic Calendar.

Ultimately, it is your responsibility to ensure that you have met coursework and other requirements to complete your degree. The MCC Graduate Program Coordinator and Advisocan assist you with this process.

Students are expected to maintain continuous registration, either active status or inactive status, throughout their program. Failure to register and pay any required fees each term will mean you will have to apply for readmission. Special permission is required to change your registration status from full-time/part-time to inactive. If you do request inactive status, you must submit a Change of Enrolment Status form. A rationale explaining the reasons for the request must be submitted. Requests for inactive status will not always be approved.

Students are required to enroll and pay fees each term that they are active in the program. Terms when students are working on major research papers or internships are considered active terms.

Important Dates and Deadlines

Academic Term Deadlines and Holidays/University Closures

Schedule of Due Dates

University Policies Regarding Courses

Course Drop/Add Dates

Students may drop or add courses through Quest until the dates specified in the Important Dates section of the Graduate Studies and Postdoctoral Affairs website:

After that date, the approval of the Associate Dean of Graduate Studies is required and a Graduate Studies Course Drop/Add form must be submitted. Courses cannot be dropped or added nor status changed after the examination period has begun.

Incomplete Courses

An incomplete grade status (INC) submitted by an instructor may remain on a student's academic record for at most two terms of enrolment following the term in which the course was taken. A student may seek a one-term extension by submitting a petition to the course instructor and the School/Department prior to the end of the two terms. If a grade has not been submitted by the end of the second term and an extension has not been granted, the INC will automatically convert to a failure to complete (FTC). For average calculation, FTC value equals 0. An FTC status may be reverted to an INC on the academic record only if a petition from the student is approved by the School/Department, Faculty, and the Associate Vice-President, Graduate Studies and Postdoctoral Affairs. Such a petition is granted only in exceptional circumstances. A failing grade in any course will necessitate a review of the candidate's status by the MCC Program Director, and a review may result in the requirement to withdraw from the program.

Academic Integrity and Ethics

The University of Waterloo recognizes that its graduate students come from a variety of cultural and educational backgrounds, and that expectations about academic integrity can differ from one institution to another. To satisfy this need for consistency across graduate programs and to inform and support our graduate students, the university has created the Graduate Academic Integrity Module (Graduate AIM) - ACINTY 630 Academic Integrity Module

The Graduate AIM is an online course that all new graduate students are required to take through Waterloo LEARN. The ACINTY 630 Academic Integrity Module is not visible in LEARN until the first day of classes each term or shortly thereafter. Students must read the information about academic integrity and then receive a mark of at least 75% on an online quiz. The quiz must be successfully completed within the first 8 weeks of the term.

Content found in the Grad AIM includes:

University policies on academic offences, intellectual property, student discipline, etc.

Common violations of academic integrity such as:

◦Cheating

◦Plagiarism

◦Unauthorized collaboration

◦Fabrication and falsification

Resources are offered campus-wide to help you act with integrity in all aspects of your university life.

The goal of the Graduate AIM is to ensure that all graduate students are given resources and information so that they are able to personally display academic integrity in their work.

Additional information on Academic Integrity can be found on the Office of Academic Integrity website:

Additional information on Ethics can be found on the Office of Research Ethics website.

Other Important Policies and Regulations

Student Advising

Questions related to logistics, University of Waterloo policies, and program policies should be addressed to the MCC Graduate Program Administrator.

Policies on Student Petitions and Grievances

If you have a question about an academic decision, you are strongly encouraged to first speak informally with the course instructor.

A student can also to speak to the MCC Graduate Program Administrator or the MCC Program Director.

The formal petition and grievance processes are set out in Policy 70, Student Petitions and Grievances.

A petition is a request by a student seeking exception to or relief from normal faculty or University rules and regulations. Typical examples include, but are not limited to, adding or dropping a course after the deadline, or removing a WD/WF grade for late drop.

While in a petition a student acknowledges that the rules were applied fairly and they are asking that an exception be made, the fundamental criterion for initiating a grievance is that a student believes that a decision of a University authority or the action of a faculty member or staff member of the University affecting some aspect of their University life has been unfair or unreasonable. Typical examples include, but are not limited to, a student questions a grade, or the instructor deviated substantially from the course outline without reasonable notice.

Note: A grievance alleging a human rights violation such as harassment or discrimination based on race, colour, sex, etc. should be handled under Policy 33, Ethical Behaviour. For guidance on the applicable policy, a student should contact the Conflict Management and Human Rights Office.

Further information regarding petitions can be found on the Graduate Studies And Postdoctoral Affairs website.

MCC Graduate Program Description and Degree Requirements

The Master of Climate Change (MCC) program is a specialized, course-based (non-thesis) program that is normally completed over a period of three terms (12 months) of full-time studies at the main campus of the University of Waterloo.

The program requires completion of:

1. Academic Integrity Module (ACINTY 630)

2. Three required core courses

3. Two climate change electives

4. Two open electives, and

5. Milestone: either a Master’s Research Paper or a four-month Internship

The 3 core courses are typically completed in the first term (Fall). The electives are spread out over the Fall and Winter terms. We recommend that no more than a total of 4 courses be taken in a term. Due to personal interest and course offerings, electives or additional courses may be completed during the Spring term (dependent on course availability).

In fullfilment of the degree requirements, students must maintain a minimum overall average of 75% in the program. A failing grade (less than 60%) in any course will necessitate a review of the candidate's status by the department, and may result in a candidate being required to withdraw from the program.

Core Courses

All students complete three core courses to ensure that they have the foundational knowledge they require. The core courses are normally completed on campus in the Fall term. They are:

GEMCC 601: Climate Change: Physical Science Basis

GEMCC 602: Climate Change: Vulnerability and Adaptation

GEMCC 603: Climate Change: Mitigation

The core courses relate directly to the three Working Groups of the United Nation's Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC): climate change science; vulnerability, impacts and adaptation; and mitigation (greenhouse gas emission reduction and carbon sequestration).

Climate Change Electives (two courses required)

Students are to select two climate change elective options. Note that course availability fluctuates from year to year, so not all courses listed here may be offered in any given year. View the most up-to-date course listings

Climate Change Electives:

  • GEMCC 610 Climate Change Prediction, Modeling and Scenarios
  • GEMCC 620 Climate Data and Analytics – offered online only
  • GEMCC 622 Climate Change, Natural Hazards and Disaster Risk Reduction
  • GEMCC 630 Land Use and the Carbon Cycle
  • GEMCC 640 Climate Change Governance: From Global Treaties to Local Innovation
  • GEMCC 644 Climate Resilient Canadians and Health Systems – offered online only
  • GEMCC 650 Climate Change and Business – offered online only
  • GEMCC 652 Climate Change and Community Planning – offered online only
  • GEMCC 660 Carbon Accounting and Management – offered online only
  • GEMCC 690 Climate Change Projects
  • GEOG 669 / ERS 619 / INDEV 606 Energy Sustainability
  • GEMCC 675 Climate Change Reading Course

GEMCC 675 Climate Change Reading Courses are generally set up between one student and one professor. To set up a designated climate change elective such as this, the student contacts a professor to determine if they would be willing to do a Reading Course. The student then works with the professor to fill out a course contract that outlines the course description and the course deliverables. GEMCC 675 Climate Change Reading Course outlines must be approved by the MCC Program Director to ensure they have sufficient climate change focus. Students can obtain a GEMCC 675 Climate Change Reading Course contract from the MCC Graduate Program Administrator. Students can only use one one-to-one reading course towards degree requirements.

Open Electives (two courses required)

The open electives allow MCC students the ability to tailor their studies to specific areas of interest.

Open electives can be selected from courses from the climate change electives list, or courses from partnering graduate programs within the Faculty of Environment, or courses from other graduate programs within the University of Waterloo. Any graduate level course is eligible as an open elective as long as a student does not choose two one-to-one special topics / reading courses.

Partnering programs within the Faculty of Environment are the Department of Geography and Environmental Management (GEM), the School of Environmental Resource Studies (SERS), the School of Environment, Enterprise and Development (SEED), the School of Planning, and the Department of Knowledge Integration (KI).

Reading Courses are generally set up between one student and one professor. To set up an elective such as this, the student contacts a professor to determine if they would be willing to do a Reading Course. The student then works with the professor to fill out a course contract that outlines the course description and the course deliverables. The contract then goes to the Graduate Officer for approval.

Milestone: Master’s Research Paper or Internship

Along with course requirements, students in the MCC program are required to achieve a milestone through completion of either a Master’s Research Paper with a climate change focus or an Internship with a climate change focus. The choice between these two options may be dependent on students’ career goals, research interests and internship opportunities. This milestone is normally completed during the third term (Spring term). This section of the Handbook details these two options and guides students through the process of deciding on either a master’s research paper or an internship practicum.

A pre-requisite is that all program core courses are completed prior to beginning the Milestone (ie: GEMCC 601 Climate Change: Physical Science Basis, GEMCC 602 Climate Change Vulnerability and Adaptation, and GEMCC 603 Climate Change Mitigation).

Master’s Research Paper Option

The Master’s Research Paper option allows students to further examine a significant topic in their area of interest within the climate change field.

Common reasons for choosing the Master’s Research Paper option:

  • You have aspirations for pursuing further education (i.e. PhD) or academic career goals,
  • You have a desire to develop deeper research and analytical skills, and produce a tangible research output for your CV,
  • You have identified a topic area of interest with an organization and/or faculty supervisor,
  • You already have practical work experience but lack research or academic experience, and/or,
  • You would like the flexibility of completing your Milestone from a location of your choice (e.g. your home country).

Examples of past Master’s Research Paper topics:

  • Analysis of climate change development projects in Pakistan
  • Developing global vulnerability indicators of climate change

For more information regarding the Master's Research Paper option can be found in ‘Appendix A: For Students Completing a Master’s Research Paper’.

Internship Option

Experiential learning is a foundation of academic programs at the University of Waterloo. The Internship Practicum provides academic credit for a practical learning experience directly related to the student’s area of interest in climate change research and professional practice. The internship is required to be a minimum of four-months in length and should be full-time equivalent. It may be paid or unpaid depending on the employer’s capacity.

Common reasons for choosing the Internship option:

  • You wish to develop skills, experience, and networks that will support your professional post-graduate career goals,
  • You have identified a potential internship opportunity with a willing employer,
  • You already have research experience but lack practical work experience, and/or,
  • You would like to earn an income during your milestone term (recognizing that unpaid internships can also provide a valuable learning experience).

Examples of past Internships held by MCC students:

  • Climate Change Adaptation Assistant - Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada (INAC)
  • Policy Analyst - Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC)
  • Risk and Vulnerability Analyst - Toronto and Region Conservation Authority (TRCA)
  • Climate Change Adaptation Intern - Ontario Centre for Climate Impacts and Adaptation Resources (OCCIAR)
  • Student Planner, Climate Change Adaptation - Region of Waterloo
  • Climate Change Adaptation Planner Intern - Atlantic Coastal Action Program
  • Research Assistant - Dalhousie University
  • Research Assistant - University of Waterloo

Please note that a practical internship is not the only route to become engaged with organizations. If you have interest in pursuing a Master’s Research Paper, but wish to gain internship-like experience, reach-out to organizations of interest and offer your time to volunteer or work on a project for them. This could potentially lead to an internship position, but can also create a chance for students to transform a term paper into a “real-world project”.

Further details regarding the Internship option can be found in 'Appendix B: For Students Completing an Internship’.

Additional Information About the University of Waterloo

Waterloo Climate Institute

The Waterloo Climate Institute advances research on climate change through an interdisciplinary approach; understanding the physical basis of climate change, its impacts on biophysical and human systems, and adaptation and mitigation strategies in response to changes. Research is supported by cutting-edge developments in observing system technologies and advanced numerical modeling.

The Waterloo Climate Institute is a focal point for researchers from different disciplines working on climate change on a variety of spatial (local to global) and temporal (annual to millennium) scales, as well as a hub for graduate students enrolled in Masters and Ph.D. programs of participating members.

The Waterloo Climate Institute is based in the Faculty of Environment but includes researchers from UW's faculties of Engineering, Mathematics, and Science, as well as from Environment Canada.

Libraries

There are two main libraries on campus. The Dana Porter (DP) Library is located in the centre of the campus and offers resources for the arts, humanities, social sciences, and houses government publications. The Davis Centre (DC) Library is located in the William G. Davis Computer Research Centre and offers resources for engineering, mathematics, and science.

A WatCard (student ID card) is required to access many library resources. Currently registered students automatically have library privileges with no activation needed. To login online, students use their last name and the 14-digit barcode number (example 21187000000000) on their WatCard.

More information regarding accessing online library resources from off-campus, including a link to the login webpage, can be found here:

Access the library anywhere

Login to access the library

Retail Services

The University of Waterloo has a number of business operations and/or support services operations at the W Store

Directions to UW and Campus Map

Directions to the main campus

Interactive campus map

Appendix A: For Students Completing a Master’s Research Paper

Master’s Research Paper

Course Evaluation: Numerical grade

A pre-requisite is that all program core courses are completed prior to beginning the Master's Research Paper. The core courses are GEMCC 601 Climate Change: Physical Science Basis, GEMCC 602 Climate Change Vulnerability and Adaptation, and GEMCC 603 Climate Change Mitigation.

Student’s Responsibility: over the first two terms, the student develops the topic of the Master’s Research Paper and identifies a suitable Supervisor. The topic must have a climate change focus.

Review the research interests of professors in the Faculty of Environment in order to identify a Supervisor.

The Master's Research Paper must be predominantly climate/climate change focused. This is a requirement of the Ministry of Education for the Master of Climate Change program.

Approval: students must email the MCC Program Director for final approval of the chosen topic to ensure it has sufficient climate change focus. This email should contain a two page summary and provide Supervisor details. Please copy in the MCC Graduate Program Coordinator.

The two page summary will include the research topic and the approach (methods, data, etc), as well as any specific outputs agreed upon with the Supervisor (e.g., a report, book chapter/journal publication, briefing note) and proposed work plan (i.e., tasks and timelines) including timelines for submission of drafts which are to be reviewed before the final copy is submitted.

At the end of this two page summary, the student and the supervisor must add their signatures to acknowledge that they have reviewed and agree upon the document.

Formally declare a Supervisor: complete a ‘Change of supervisor’ form.

  1. The student will complete sections 1 & 2, and sign and date the form. The form can be e-signed using the Fill & Sign function in the Tools option.
  2. The student will obtain the signature of the declared supervisor in section 2.
  3. The student will submit the completed form to the MCC Graduate Program Coordinator for further processing.

The student works one-on-one with their supervisor to complete the Master’s Research Paper.

The Supervisor, in consultation with the MCC Program Director, will approve one additional independent Reader to evaluate the paper. The assigned grade will reflect the evaluation of both the Supervisor and the Reader.

The Master’s Research Paper will be between 40 - 60 pages in length (double-spaced, 12 point font size, and font style of Arial or Times New Roman).

It should include clearly defined sections that cover the following:

  1. author's declaration,
  2. problem statement/research question,
  3. status of research literature,
  4. research procedures/methods,
  5. findings/results, and
  6. conclusions/recommendations

Author's Declaration:

I hereby declare that I am the sole author of this master’s research paper. This is a true copy of the master’s research paper, including any required final revisions, as accepted by examiners. I understand that this master’s research paper may be made electronically available to the public.

The APA citation style is used.

Graphical, tabular and photographic illustrations: Graphs, maps and tables all provide information so they can be used in any report, including a proposal.  However, never include filler, such as graphs that are not referred to in the text or tables that contain too much detail. Always think about how information can be best communicated to the reader. Be careful so as not to over describe a graph or table; just make the points which are central to your argument.

Students are encouraged to use iThenticate before they submit their Master’s Research Paper. More information regarding iThenticate can be found on the Academic Integrity website.

The University of Waterloo library website has more information on reference material and referencing:

The submission deadline of the final copy for students completing their Master’s Research Paper in the Spring term is August 15th (December 15th for students completing their Master's Research Paper in the Fall term; April 15th for students completing their Master's Research Paper in the Winter term).

Submission of the final copy of the Master's Research Paper should be via email as a PDF – one email to the supervisor and the reader with the MCC Graduate Program Coordinator copied in (a copy is required for the student file).

Once the Master’s Research Paper is graded by the Supervisor and Reader, a Milestone Completion form will be completed by the MCC Graduate Program Coordinator and submitted to the Graduate Studies and Postdoctoral Affairs.

Appendix B: For Students Completing an Internship

Graduate Studies Internship

All internship students are required to spend the equivalent of one academic term as an intern working on climate change in the public or private sector, at a research institute, or for a non-governmental organization. It is the student’s primary responsibility to identify potential organizations with which to undertake their internship, although some employers recruit for positions through the program. The work term will normally take place in the third term of the program. The internship must be approved as being a suitable practical learning experience having sufficient climate change focus to be eligible. Students will be required to submit a short proposal outlining how the work of the organization and the internship position relates to the climate change program curriculum, the student’s professional interests, and the professional experience sought through the internship. A final written report arising out of the internship experience will be required and will be evaluated.

Course Evaluation: Credit / No Credit

Internships must be predominantly climate/climate change focused. This is a requirement of the Ministry of Education for the Master of Climate Change program.

Pre-requisite: normally all core courses are completed prior to beginning the internship. The core courses are GEMCC 601 Climate Change: Physical Science Basis, GEMCC 602 Climate Change Vulnerability and Adaptation, and GEMCC 603 Climate Change Mitigation.

Student’s Responsibility: it is the student’s primary responsibility to identify potential organizations with which to undertake their internship. Students can do this on their own and with the support of GradWIL/WaterlooWorks.

Approval: approval must be obtained from the GradWIL MCC Internship Advisor via the WaterlooWorks/ArrangeOwnJob processes.

Change of Enrolment Status: full-time students who are completing an off-campus internship and who are not taking any on-campus courses should complete a ‘Change of Enrolment Status’ form. The form can be found here:  https://uwaterloo.ca/forms/graduate-studies/change-enrolment-status

  • download/open the form as a fillable PDF; fill out sections 1 and 2; select the status change option Full-time off-campus (e.g. internship, exchange)
  • e-sign the form using the Fill & Sign function in the Tools option. The form should then be emailed to the MCC Graduate Program Coordinator who will send it through for processing.

Internship Proposal: once approved, the student will prepare an internship proposal (approximately 1 - 2 pages in length, double spaced, 12 point font size, and font style of Arial or Times New Roman).

A copy of the proposal should be submitted via email to the MCC Program Director with the MCC Graduate Program Coordinator copied in.

The proposal should be submitted at least two weeks before the start of the internship.

This proposal should include:

  • the student's name and student id number
  • the name of the organization
  • how the work of the organization relates to the climate change program curriculum and the student’s professional interests
  • the professional experience sought through the internship

Internship Report: To complete the internship milestone, students submit a written report, summarizing their internship activities and reflecting on their internship experience.

The report should be no more than 20 pages double-spaced, 12 point font size, and font style of Arial or Times New Roman. The 20 pages includes all references, images, title page, etc. Examples of key professional outputs (e.g., a report, policy brief, designs) and feedback from supervisors and stakeholders/clients can be attached as appendices. Appendices are in addition to the 20 pages.

A copy of the report should be submitted via email to the MCC Program Director with the MCC Graduate Program Coordinator copied in.

The report is due August 15th for students completing their internship in the Spring term (December 15th for students completing their internship in the Fall term; April 15th for students completing their internship in the Winter term).

The report should include the following components:

  1. Title Page – Include the report title; employer's name and location; date of report; your name, student number, email address, and term and year; the university name; and the phrase ‘In partial fulfillment of the requirements of the Master of Climate Change Program’.
  2. Introduction and Professional Experience Summary – Briefly outline of the climate change mandate of the organization and the specific work of the organization division/team you interned with. Include the name of your supervisor and the location and dates worked. Provide a description of your professional experience gained, including specific projects, responsibilities, and key outputs.
  3. Experiential Learning Impact – Briefly reflect on and discuss the following:
  • In what areas did you experience the most professional growth?
  • What insights have you gained into the field of climate change?
  • Based on your internship experience, what skills would you like to develop in your career?
  • How has the internship influenced your career goals? Please explain.
  • What insights have you gained regarding the information gaps and the need for research in the area(s) of climate change that you worked in?
  • How your experience links to the program curriculum and your professional developmental goals?
  • Feedback from supervisors and stakeholders/clients can be included in your responses or attached as an appendix.
  1. Internship Evaluation – Briefly discuss the following:
  • Did the internship experience meet your personal expectations?
  • How would you assess your performance at the organization?
  • Would you recommend this organization/role to future MCC interns?
  1. Internship Report Release – If you are willing to give future MCC students permission to review your report in order to benefit from your internship experience, please include the Internship Release Statement at the end of your report.

Internship Release Statement:

I hereby give my permission to allow students in the Master of Climate Change program to have access to my internship report to enable them to benefit from my internship experience. I fully understand that once I have graduated from the University of Waterloo, my internship report will become property of the MCC program, and students will be permitted to access a PDF copy.

Name: _______________________________________

Date: _______________________________________

Upon completion of the internship, and submission and approval of the written report, a Milestone Completion form will be completed by the MCC Graduate Program Coordinator and submitted to the Graduate Studies and Postdoctoral Affairs. Graduate Studies will update your transcript.