Cognitive Neuroscience - Research facilities

Research facilities

The Cognitive Neuroscience area at the University of Waterloo offers a broad range of research facilities that ensure students are trained in leading-edge methods for understanding brain-behaviour relationships. These range from kinematic measures of eye and hand movements to electroencephalogram (EEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) measures. Below are some brief descriptions of the broad range of research facilities available through the Cognitive Neuroscience area.

Event-related potentials:

Roxane Itier and Jonathan Fugelsang recently established two new electroencephalography (EEG) systems (Biosemi ActiveTwo systems, 72 channels each). These systems allow the recording of neural activity alone or in conjunction with other physiological measures such as Galvanic Skin Response (GSR). One system also allows the neural activity to be co-registered with eye movements obtained from an eye tracking system (EyeLink 1000 remote).

Functional MRI:

James Danckert established the Neurological Patient Database (NPD) in 2005 to recruit patients who had suffered a neurological injury and were interested in participating in research at UWaterloo. The database facilitates ongoing research exploring the neural bases of behavior, which is used for basic science and to develop and refine methods of rehabilitation. As of January 2014, the database has over 500 participants enrolled. Patients are screened for the presence of neglect and apraxia and have CT and MRI scan information entered into the database to enable searches for participants with specific regions of damage.

Centre for Theoretical Neuroscience (CTN):

The Centre for Theoretical Neuroscience at the University of Waterloo was established in 2008 and supports collaboration and training in theoretical neuroscience. The CTN sponsors seminars, an annual Brain Day conference, and oversees training opportunities. The CTN offers the opportunity for Psychology PhD students to complete a diploma in Theoretical Neuroscience as an additional specialization. .

Waterloo Research in Aging Participant Pool (WRAP):

In collaboration with researchers in the Faculty of Applied Health Sciences at uWaterloo, we established the Waterloo Research in Aging Participant Pool (WRAP). This project has put into place a new population, senior citizens, for students to access for research studies. The WRAP aids graduate students interested in studying the aging process by dramatically increasing the feasibility of conducting studies with this population. Many researchers using this Participant Pool are affiliated with the University of Waterloo’s Research Institute of Aging which promotes research relevant to senior citizens in the general community, and in Long-term care facilities (see The Research Institute for Aging).

Neurological Patient Database (NPD):

James Danckert established the NPD in 2005 to recruit patients who had suffered a neurological injury and were interested in participating in research at uWaterloo. The database facilitates ongoing research exploring the neural bases of behavior, which is used for basic science and to develop and refine methods of rehabilitation. As of January 2014, the database has over 500 participants enrolled. Patients are screened for the presence of neglect and apraxia and have CT and MRI scan information entered into the database to enable searches for participants with specific regions of damage.

Problem Gambling Laboratory:

Our Problem Gambling Laboratory includes slot machine simulators, as well as real slot machines. We have three traditional mechanical reel slot machines and five modern, multi-line video slot machines of the type found in casinos and slots venues throughout Ontario.  Our slots lab is equipped to measure electrodermal (galvanic skin conductance) responses, heart rate responses, as well as eye tracking.


Cognitive Neuroscience Core Faculty