Social class patterns in child-rearing and current debates on ‘good parenting’ in GermanyExport this event to calendar

Friday, January 24, 2020 — 11:30 AM EST

Please join the Department of Sociology and Legal Studies for a talk by visiting lecturer, Frederick de Moll, a postdoctoral researcher in the Department of Social Sciences of the University of Luxembourg.

Abstract

In recent years, public and political debates on educational inequality have increasingly focused on parents’ influence on children’s academic development. However, it remains unknown how parents on both ends of the social stratum respond to heightened expectations toward their responsibility to promote their children’s chances for academic success. Drawing on a Bourdieusian framework, the study examines social disparities in parents’ child­rearing practices in Germany. I ask to what degree parents believe in their capacity to improve their children’s education, and how they view the task of parenting. The analysis makes use of survey data that were collected in two major urban areas in Germany during the years 2012 and 2013. For the kindergarten sample, questionnaires were administered to N = 847 parents with children three to five years old. The analyses of parenting during primary school draw on data from N = 1069 parents with school children in grade three and four (9–12 years old). The findings reveal solid social inequalities among parents with children in both age groups. More well-off parents engage in concerted cultivation practices from an early age on and they are more confident about their child’s educational opportunities. However, among the lower-class, parents’ efforts and self-beliefs in regard to promoting their children’s academic success show a more complex picture.

About the speaker

Frederick de MollFrederick de Moll is a postdoctoral researcher in the Department of Social Sciences of the University of Luxembourg, where he joined the Institute for Education and Society in 2019. Frederick’s interests include educational inequality, parenting, and family processes. He also focuses on children’s attitudes and non-cognitive dispositions towards school and learning, and how these are associated with academic achievement. Prior to coming to work at Luxembourg, Frederick was a faculty member in the education department at Goethe University Frankfurt, where he received his doctorate degree in 2016. He was educated at Julius Maximilian University of Würzburg, where he studied education, sociology, and psychology.

Location 
HH - J.G. Hagey Hall of the Humanities
HH 1102 (SAF wing)
200 University Avenue West

Waterloo, ON N2L 3G1
Canada

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