Smoking in the provinces

Smoking prevalence by province

See data table below with 95% confidence intervals.In 2017, there was significant variation in smoking prevalence by province31 (Figure 2.1). Current smoking rates ranged from a low of 11.8% in Prince Edward Island to a high of 20.1% in Newfoundland and Labrador.

Between 1999 and 2017, smoking prevalence decreased substantially in all provinces, although not consistently (Table 2.1). There was considerable variation by province in the magnitude of this decline: from nearly 15 percentage points in Quebec, to around 4 in British Columbia (which had the lowest smoking rate throughout most of this time period, until 2017).

In many provinces, small increases in smoking prevalence estimates were observed between 2015 and 2017.

See data table below with 95% confidence intervals.

Download table 2.1 Smoking prevalence by province, 1999-2017 (.xlsx)

 Cigarette consumption by province

See data table below with 95% confidence intervals.In 2017, average daily cigarette consumption estimates ranged from 11.9 cigarettes per day (CPD) in Alberta to 18.6 CPD in Newfoundland and Labrador (Figure 2.2). However, overall differences in provincial estimates were not statistically significant.32

Between 1999 and 2017, average daily cigarette consumption appears to have decreased in nearly all provinces, although with little to no progress (and even some increases) in the most recent years in many provinces (Table 2.2). The magnitude of this decline varied by province, with the largest decreases observed in New Brunswick (from 18.3 in 1999 to 12.8 CPD in 2017) and Quebec (from 19.1 in 1999 to 13.6 CPD in 2017).

 See data table below with 95% confidence intervals.

Download table 2.2 Average daily cigarette consumption* by province, 1999-2017 (.xlsx)