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Smoking prevalence

Smoking prevalence

 Canadian Tobacco, Alcohol and Drugs Survey, 2015; Canadian Student Tobacco, Alcohol and Drugs Survey, 2014-15. See data table with 95% confidence intervals below.In 2014-15, the overall smoking rate among students in grades 6-9 was below 2%, although the exact estimate is suppressed due to unacceptable quality. Among adolescents aged 15-19, 9.7% were current smokers in 2015, with substantial variation by age, from 5.0% among 15- and 16-year-olds to 17.7% of 19-year-olds. Daily smoking (at 4.3%) accounted for just under half of smoking among youth, and increased with age (Figure 8.1).

Smoking prevalence among students in grades 6-9 dropped by more than half between 1994 and 2002, and has since remained low. Between 2012-13 and 2014-15, prevalence decreased significantly overall74 and for non-daily75 smoking, but not for daily smoking76 (Figure 8.2).


Among youth aged 15-19, smoking prevalence declined steadily after 1999 for several years before leveling off and then again decreasing to another plateau; since 2008, prevalence has declined very slowly and gradually (Figure 8.2). Between 2013 and 2015, there was no significant change in overall, daily, or non-daily smoking prevalence.77-79 Most of the decline in smoking observed among 15- to 19-year-olds appears to be due to decreasing daily smoking.

 Current smoking prevalence* (daily and non-daily), Grades 6-9 and age 15-19, 1994-2015. *Current daily/non-daily smoker and smoked in past 30 days. **Exact estimate suppressed due to unacceptable quality. The upper bound of the estimate is <2%. Data sources: Canadian Tobacco Use Monitoring Survey, 1999-2012; Canadian Tobacco, Alcohol and Drugs Survey, 2013, 2015; Youth Smoking Survey, 1994, 2002, 2004-05, 2006-07, 2008-09, 2010-11, 2012-13; Canadian Student Tobacco, Alcohol and Drugs Survey, 2014-15. See data table with 95% confidence intervals below.