Monday, March 11, 2024

Meet Pengyu Nie, a professor who uses machine learning and natural language processing to improve software engineering

photo of Professor Pengyu Nie

Pengyu Nie obtained his PhD in 2023 and MSc in 2020 from The University of Texas at Austin, where he was advised by Milos Gligoric. He has a BSc from University of Science and Technology of China, which he received in 2017.

Friday, March 8, 2024

International Women’s Day: Celebrating five Cheriton School of Computer Science researchers

Photo of cs researchers

Friday, March 8, 2024 marks International Women’s Day, a global holiday recognizing gender-related issues and honouring female achievements. To celebrate, the Cheriton School of Computer Science is highlighting five female students and faculty who paved significant research breakthroughs this past year.  

Thursday, March 7, 2024

Cheriton researchers find that survey participants duped by AI-generated images nearly 40 per cent of the time

photo of Lesley Istead, Andreea Pocol, Sabrina Mokhtari

If you have trouble figuring out if an image of a person is real or if it’s been generated using artificial intelligence, you’re not alone.

A new study conducted by Cheriton School of Computer Science researchers found that people had more difficulty than expected distinguishing who is a real person and who is artificially generated.

The study saw 260 participants provided with 20 unlabeled pictures: 10 of which were of real people obtained from Google searches, and the other 10 generated by Stable Diffusion or DALL-E, two commonly used AI programs that generate images.

Thursday, February 1, 2024

Global Futures: Using technology to help humans flourish

photo of Professor Edith Law

Edith Law is a Professor at the Cheriton School of Computer Science, where she co-directs the Human-Computer Interaction Lab. Her research delves into social computing technology, machine intelligence interactions, and the design and user experience of technology that upholds important human values.

Professor Law explains how we can harness the power of new technologies ethically for the betterment of humanity.

Opinion by Professor Law

Wednesday, January 31, 2024

Global Futures: University Professor Ming Li and his team use deep learning to develop personalized cancer vaccines

Photo of University Professor Mong Li

Cancer is the leading cause of death in Canada. According to the Canadian Cancer Society, an estimated 230,000 people are diagnosed with the disease every year.  

University Professor Ming Li, the Canada Research Chair in Bioinformatics, is using deep learning technology to make personalized cancer vaccines accessible to everyone. He began doing cancer research when his wife, Jessie W. H. Zou, was diagnosed with breast cancer. Though she died in 2010, her legacy continues in his research. 

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