New tech monitors power use for signs of cyberattack

Wednesday, February 23, 2022

It has been a long but rewarding journey since Sebastian Fischmeister first hit on the concept of using involuntary emissions such as power consumption as a window into the workings of computer systems.

Early work on the idea as a means of debugging programs without shutting them down earned the electrical and computer engineering professor a best paper award soon after he came to the University of Waterloo.

And now, more than a dozen years and an important pivot later, Fischmeister, his research team and a spinoff hardware company are using the novel approach to help protect Ontario municipalities from costly, disruptive cyberattacks.

“It feels great to see technology make the transition from pen and paper, from a theoretical idea, to the actual detection of spreading ransomware to protect computing systems,” he said.

Go to 'We can protect anything that consumes power' for the full story.

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